Posted Jun 1, 2016

Healthcare Closer to Home Visits Metro Food Basic Pharmacy in Sudbury

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Pharmacists, Sudbury
Healthcare Closer to Home Visits Metro Food Basic Pharmacy in Sudbury
Neighbourhood Pharmacies completed the thirty-second Healthcare Closer to Home pharmacy visit May 20, welcoming Sudbury MPP Glenn Thibeault to the Metro Food Basics Pharmacy.

Healthcare Closer to Home Visits Metro Food Basic Pharmacy in Sudbury

Neighbourhood Pharmacies completed the thirty-second Healthcare Closer to Home pharmacy visit May 20, welcoming Sudbury MPP Glenn Thibeault to the Metro Food Basics Pharmacy.

 

Thibeault (centre) spoke with Pharmacy Manager Sami Dabliz (right) and Metro Director, Pharmacy Operations, Emil Laswardi (far right) and representatives from the Sudbury Star, Northern Lights/Sudbury.com and CBC Radio-Canada. The program continues this summer.

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News
Posted May 25, 2016

NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACIES’ LEN MARKS PHARMACY ADVANCEMENT AWARD

Announcement, awards
NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACIES’ LEN MARKS PHARMACY ADVANCEMENT AWARD
SANDRA AYLWARD NAMED RECIPIENT OF NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACIES’ LEN MARKS PHARMACY ADVANCEMENT AWARD

TORONTO, May 25, 2016 – The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) today announced that Sandra Aylward, who has been involved in Canada’s retail pharmacy industry for more than 30 years, has been named the 2016 recipient of the Len Marks Pharmacy Advancement Award.

 

A respected voice for pharmacy and as a past Chair of the Canadian Association of Chain Drug Stores (predecessor to Neighbourhood Pharmacies), Sandra dedicated much of her time to working with associations to advance pharmacy practice, to engage with governments to improve scope of practice, as well as reimbursement models. She has also been heavily involved in negotiations with governments on pharmacy service agreements and drug pricing reform.

 

Sandra has left her mark across the industry nationally and has been an outstanding leader in pharmacy. By promoting the role of the pharmacist as a frontline healthcare practitioner, and by engaging elected provincial politicians, Sandra has been instrumental in expanding pharmacists’ scope of practice across the country.

 

At Dalhousie University, Sandra took a leadership role in encouraging pharmacy students to become informed and active in professional advocacy issues, including the expanded role pharmacists can play in healthcare today. Sandra spent much of her career with Sobeys, where she worked with the Pharmacy Association of Nova Scotia, and other professional associations in Atlantic Canada in advancing pharmacy practice, in support of The Blueprint for Pharmacy and many other campaigns to increase implementation, access and funding for pharmacy services beyond traditional dispensing.

 

The award will be presented at the Chairman’s Dinner, June 14, 2016, during Pharmacy EXPO 2016.

 

The Len Marks Pharmacy Advancement Award recipient is: Involved in supporting the development and excellence of pharmacy education at the university level, encouraging students to enter pharmacy as a career advance the standards of healthcare delivery; provides an environment ripe for education and training for pharmacy staff to advance the standards of healthcare delivery; and, promotes pharmacy as a community resource in the provision of pharmacy services and brings the attention of government and industry partners to the valuable contribution of community pharmacy. 

Past recipients of the Len Marks Pharmacy Advancement Award include: David Windross, 2013; Russell Cohen, 2012; Barbara Wells, 2010; Albert Falardeau, 2009; and Sean McKelvey, 2008.

Neighbourhood Pharmacies represents the owners and operators of Canada’s leading drug store brands, operating in corporate chains, banners and buying groups, as well as mass merchandisers and grocery chains with pharmacies.

Further information:

Allan McN. Austin

Director, Communications

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

647 465 7596

 

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News
Posted May 25, 2016

ASSOCIATE OF THE YEAR 2016

Announcement, awards
ASSOCIATE OF THE YEAR 2016
PETER HARDWICK NAMED DISTINGUISHED ASSOCIATE OF THE YEAR 2016 BY NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

TORONTO, May 25, 2016 – The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies), today announced that Peter Hardwick, Senior Vice President Commercial Operations Canada and Caribbean, Apotex Inc., has been named its 2016 Distinguished Associate of the Year.

 

Widely regarded as a leader in Canada’s broader pharmacy industry, Peter always brings a high-level perspective which seeks to put industry advancement ahead of competitive interests. A true partner in the business, Peter has been instrumental in ensuring that the Canadian industry has been exposed to a wide range of innovators and views and experiences of those in other markets. He has also been an active, long-term supporter of Neighbourhood Pharmacies and its predecessor the Canadian Association of Chain Drug Stores and has participated in its committee work and in strategic initiatives, as well as serving as co-chair of the planning committee for the Association’s 2013 annual conference in Halifax.

 

Before taking on his current responsibilities, Peter was Senior Vice President Sales and Marketing at Apotex. He previously served with Mepha as Director of Marketing and with Syntex as a Sales Representative. Peter is a member of the Class of 1990 from Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, and he undertook further education at Ashridge Executive Education at the Hult International Business School in the United Kingdom.

 

The award will be presented at the Chairman’s Dinner, June 14, 2016, during Pharmacy EXPO 2016.

 

The Distinguished Associate of the Year award honours a Neighbourhood Pharmacies Associate in good standing who displays commitment to Association initiatives, committees or initiatives, and who contributes to the advancement of the community pharmacy industry. 

 

Past Neighbourhood Pharmacies Distinguished Associates of the Year have included: Don Bird, WN Pharmaceuticals, 2013; Carol MacDonald, Pfizer Canada Inc., 2012; Paul Porter, Advantage International, 2010; Jean Legault, Beiersdorf Canada Inc., 2009; Rita Egan, AstraZeneca Canada Inc., 2008; Rod Sturtridge, Carlton Cards Limited, 2007; and, Jack Kay, Apotex Inc., 2001.

 

Neighbourhood Pharmacies represents the owners and operators of Canada’s leading drug store brands, operating in corporate chains, banners and buying groups, as well as mass merchandisers and grocery chains with pharmacies.

 

Further information:

Allan McN. Austin

Director, Communications

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

647 465 7596

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News
Posted May 25, 2016

Change in Leadership Annoucement

Announcement

The Board of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) is pleased to announce that, effective immediately, Justin Bates will become Senior Vice-President Pharmacy and CEO of Neighbourhood Pharmacies on an interim basis. The Neighbourhood Pharmacies team will report to Justin. 
 
This important appointment acknowledges Justin’s expertise, his reputation among stakeholders and his commitment to support and promote the business of pharmacy in Canada. A search to recruit a permanent CEO will begin shortly.
 
In leading a re-focused and re-energized Association, we are committed to connect with our members and corporate partners in the upcoming weeks to gather their views on proper alignment and services across the country, and to ensure that our members remain the Association’s top priority.
 
Denise Carpenter has left the Association. On behalf of the Board and Neighbourhood Pharmacies members, we thank Denise for her many contributions to the Association and wish her the best of luck in all her future endeavors.
 
Vivek Sood
Chair of the Board

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News
Posted Apr 4, 2016

Changes coming for pharmacists, increased authority to immunize

Expanded Scope of Practice, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario
Changes coming for pharmacists, increased authority to immunize
Ontario’s Health Minister Eric Hoskins announcement at Med-Health Pharmacy, a former Healthcare Closer to Home pharmacy Friday, April 1…

http://www.cambridgetimes.ca/news-story/6436698-changes-coming-for-pharmacists-increased-authority-to-immunize/

Cambridge, ON

CAMBRIDGE – Pharmacists will soon be able to give travel vaccine injections, as well as a handful of other immunizations, as part of a government effort to make health care more accessible and efficient.

The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care is starting to act on plans made in consultation with pharmacy associations that will give pharmacists increased powers.

Although pharmacists are already empowered to offer flu immunizations at drug stores, their scope of practice will soon include the ability to offer a limited number of vaccines recommended for travel, including Hepatitis A and B. Other vaccines, including meningococcal, rabies, shingles and HPV, are likely to be on the list of vaccines that can be injected by druggists, as early as next fall.

The planned changes to health care delivery were highlighted by Minister of Health Eric Hoskins last Friday (April 1) during a “budget highlights” visit, staged at Cambridge’s Med-Health Pharmacy on Coronation Boulevard.

The step to give pharmacists increased power is just one of the ways the Ontario Liberals are “transforming” health care to put patients first, said Hoskins, during the news conference.

Pharmacists do more than fill prescriptions, said the minister. They are fully trained to offer injections and are a convenient and a trusted contact for those seeking health care advice, he added.

A pharmacist’s importance to health care delivery should never be taken for granted, insisted the minister.

“We’re continuing to make efforts on how we can bring them even further into the health care system and enable our pharmacists to work to the maximum of their abilities and their competencies,” he said.

“It’s convenient and clearly it saves money, and when you think of something that is patients-first, it truly is an example of that.”

During the past year, more than a million people obtained flu shots at pharmacies, explained Denise Carpenter, chief executive officer of the Neighbourhood Pharmacies Association, which represents drug store chains throughout Canada.

That’s proof the appetite is there among those who want more easy access to health care, she said.

The plan to give pharmacists more authority is just one of many changes to come, according to Hoskins. The ministry is also looking at allowing pharmacists to assess and write prescriptions for minor ailments, a practice that is already permitted in other areas of Canada.

“Ontario really is lagging behind other provinces when it comes to enabling pharmacists to prescribe and treat for minor ailments,” he said.

Authorizing pharmacists to deliver injections, and even to assess and treat customers for minor ailments, is a change that is long overdue, maintains Mukesh Kshatri, manger of the Med-Health Pharmacy.

“First and foremost, we are health care professionals,” he said. “You’ve got to get the business side out of it and do what we’re trained to do.”

It just makes sense to permit pharmacists to treat patients for minor issues, he argued, especially when they are already performing a kind of triage, but without the ability to take action.

“Giving us that privilege will streamline a lot of care for our patients without having to spend health dollars in emergency for minor ailments.”

It will also mean druggists can adjust medications prescribed by doctors and offer cheaper alternatives or medications that could be associated with fewer side effects.

There are no current plans to add immunizations required for children to attend school to the list of vaccinations that might be offered at local pharmacies, said Hoskins.

Any immunizations currently offered free at physician offices or public health units will only be available via those sources.

Meanwhile, nearly 2,000 elementary students in Waterloo Region face possible suspension from school for up to 20 days for not having immunization records on file with public health.

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News
Posted Apr 4, 2016

MPP Takes Pharmacy Tour

Expanded Scope of Practice, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario
MPP Takes Pharmacy Tour
Local MPP Bill Walker says he’s impressed at how pharmacies cater to long term facilities…

http://www.bayshorebroadcasting.ca/news_item.php?NewsID=83405
Owen Sound, ON

MPP Takes Pharmacy Tour

Thursday, March 31, 2016 1:57 PM by Matthew Sanderson

Bill Walker says impressed at how pharmacies cater to long term facilities.

 

Members of Medical Pharmacies pose with MPP Bill Walker after his tour on Wednesday. (photo by Matt Sanderson)

 

(Owen Sound) -

A tour took place Wednesday at Medical Pharmacies at the medical office on 8th Street East in Owen Sound.

The "Healthcare Closer to Home" program brings politicians into neighbourhood pharmacies and educates those members of government on what they are capable of.

Bruce Grey Owen Sound Conservative MPP Bill Walker attended the event to grasp a better perspective of what the employees at the pharmacy specialize in.

This local pharmacy does much more than give out drugs.

The pharmaceutical institute works with local Long Term Care facilities in giving the proper medication to patients.

Walker says he was impressed with how much they cater to long term care facilities -- which is something he is a very strong advocate for.

He adds they work very close with doctors to make sure proper medications are prescribed.

Pharmacist Manager Danielle Parker says they sometimes meet with patients and have standardized information on their health and medical background.

Medical Pharmacies says 90 per cent of their customers are Long Term Care based and 10 per cent are retail customers.

Officials also can give flu shots and in 2014/2015 there was a 20 per cent growth in Pharmacist Flu Vaccinations.

Walker says all pharmacies are changing into diverse facilities where, if you need something small like a shot you can go there rather than waiting in line at the doctors.

As of right now the flu vaccination is the only shot given -- but they're hoping to expand that soon.

Walker tells Bayshore Broadcasting News Medical Pharmacies has a good system for medication and they communicate with physicians well.

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News
Posted Mar 11, 2016

Medical marijuana? Let’s get this right.

medical marijuana, Pharmacy U
Medical marijuana? Let’s get this right.
There’s a long road to travel before broader availability of medical marijuana is a reality in Canada. But the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) is working now to ensure the best outcomes for patients and the communit

There’s a long road to travel before broader availability of medical marijuana is a reality in Canada.

But the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) is working now to ensure the best outcomes for patients and the community.

First, more research is required so that Health Canada and all other stakeholders can be fully aware of the safety and efficacy of medical marijuana,” says Denise Carpenter, President and Chief Executive Officer of Neighbourhood Pharmacies. “There’s no clear consensus here, so don’t expect liberalized distribution to be either quick or easily accomplished.”

Treating medical marijuana as a prescription drug supports the rationale for involving Neighbourhood Pharmacies in developing the framework for making it available to Canadian patients through their community pharmacies, Carpenter added.

As experts in medication and medication management, our members’ pharmacists help prescribers and patients alike get the best results from their prescription medications. That expertise can include therapeutic substitution, as well as counselling on dosage, frequency, delivery route and when to take medications in relation to meals, as well as practical advice on safe product handling and disposal.

Neighbourhood pharmacies also have sophisticated drug-interaction and dispensing software systems available to monitor patients and track medication use, and to identify and prevent potentially harmful drug interactions. Like many other therapeutic products, medical marijuana is known to have serious side effects and potential interactions.

Canada’s neighbourhood pharmacies benefit from an established distribution system that already handles controlled substances safely and reliably, so this is another important argument in favour of routing any potential sale of medical marijuana through pharmacies.

In-store, our members use sophisticated inventory management practices to safeguard stocks of controlled substances, as well as to prevent and detect product diversions or theft.

Ultimately and if approved, any future sale of medical marijuana through the neighbourhood pharmacy channel will be a decision for individual businesses.
With a Health Canada regulatory framework in place to enable distribution of medical marijuana through neighbourhood pharmacies, we believe that patients’ safety and clinical interests will be best served.

General Resources
Posted Jan 27, 2016

BAYSHORE SPECIALTY RX JOINS NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACIES

Member Update, News, News Release, Bayshore Specialty Rx, Membership
TORONTO, – Bayshore Specialty Rx, which provides integrated support services for patients with complex therapies, has become a member of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies), effective January 1, 2016. Patient servic

BAYSHORE SPECIALTY RX JOINS NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACIES

  • 13 Specialty pharmacies across Canada
  • Canada’s largest provider of home and community healthcare services
  • Operates 50 infusion clinics, specializes in patient-support programs

TORONTO, – Bayshore Specialty Rx, which provides integrated support services for patients with complex therapies, has become a member of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies), effective January 1, 2016. Patient services include data management support, specialty nursing, specialty pharmacy, reimbursement services, a call centre, 60 nursing branches and 50 infusion centres across the country.

“Bayshore’s decision to align itself with Neighbourhood Pharmacies provides further evidence of the growing importance of the specialty pharmacy segment,” said Denise Carpenter, President and Chief Executive Officer of Neighbourhood Pharmacies. “Complex new drug therapies, such as biologics, offer many patients new hope, but require both sophisticated handling and storage, and often-complex patient supports, including local infusion capabilities. This business segment faces challenges with public and private payers, and membership in pharmacy’s leading trade association will help ensure that the company’s needs are heard and understood.”  

“Bayshore is proud to be a member of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada. Our Specialty Pharmacy staff takes pride in focusing on the clinical needs of our patients by integrating a multi-disciplinary team of healthcare professionals. In a complex and ever-changing healthcare environment, Specialty Pharmacy needs a strong voice now more than ever and we are looking forward participating and lending our full support to the association.” said Karl Frank, Divisional Director of Bayshore Specialty Rx.  

Bayshore is the country’s largest provider of home and community healthcare services, operating 60 home care offices, 13 pharmacies and 50 community care clinics with a team of more than 11,000 staff members.

Neighbourhood Pharmacies represents the owners and operators of Canada’s leading drug store brands, operating in corporate chains, banners and buying groups, as well as mass merchandisers and grocery chains with pharmacies.

For further information:

Allan McN. Austin

Director, Communications

647 465 7596

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News
Posted Jan 21, 2016

Healthcare Leaders Should Focus on Patients – Statement from Denise Carpenter

Healthcare, Patient Care, Government Relations
Healthcare Leaders Should Focus on Patients – Statement from Denise Carpenter
The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada – the respected voice and advocate for the business of pharmacy in Canada – today released the following statement by Denise Carpenter, ICD.D, President and CEO

Statement from the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada by Denise Carpenter, President and CEO

TORONTO, Jan. 19, 2016 /CNW/ - The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada – the respected voice and advocate for the business of pharmacy in Canada – today released the following statement by Denise Carpenter, ICD.D, President and CEO.

"As Canada's health ministers gather this week in Vancouver to plan the path forward for our country's healthcare delivery system, it's time to point them towards what should be our top priority and theirs: patients.

By focusing first on patients – not just on costs – we can achieve better patient care and lower overall costs. We need to spend smarter and demand a better return on taxpayers' scarce healthcare dollars.

We need to leverage what our healthcare delivery system currently does well through innovation, to improve patient outcomes and enhance taxpayer value. Isolated policy changes and standalone programs can no longer improve patient care, lower system costs or contribute to system sustainability. Simply cutting costs doesn't improve patients' outcomes, because no one ever got better sooner because their doctor, nurse or pharmacy was paid less.

Of course, managing rapidly rising costs is essential, particularly because of the new medications such as biologics that deliver effective solutions for previously untreatable diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, but which carry high price tags. The human costs of disease are very real and as a society we should focus first on those.

What has been shown to deliver better treatment, better outcomes and better costs is treating patients in their neighbourhood pharmacies, closer to where they live work and play. Not for all conditions, but for carefully limited circumstances, such as vaccinations and the assessment and treatment of minor ailments.

Pharmacy flu vaccinations, for example, are extremely popular with Canadians, 95 per cent of whom (according to our research) are highly satisfied with their treatment and its convenience. The number of people who have received flu protection at a neighbourhood pharmacy has climbed steadily, from just 60,000 in the 2010 – 2011 season, to an expected two million this season. Pharmacy flu vaccinations also attract those who have not had a flu shot in the previous season – that helps reduce the spread of the disease and reduces complications, hospitalizations and even deaths. Pharmacy flu shots reduce both human and economic costs – that's smart spending.

Pharmacy assessment and treatment of minor ailments, like thrush, allergic rhinitis and dermatitis can also provide cost-effective professional healthcare. One familiar example is the mother with a young child developing diaper rash late on Friday, and who can't get to her pediatrician until Monday at the earliest, resulting in an uncomfortable weekend for the whole family. Pharmacists with expanded scope of practice can assess and treat at the same time and in the same place. That way the healing begins at once, instead of being unnecessarily delayed, and subjecting the patient – and the healthcare system – to the risk of complications and added costs.      

Pharmacy care for common ailments frees physicians to treat more complex cases, diverts simple cases from hospital emergency rooms, and creates substantial savings for the healthcare system resulting in 33-37 per cent fewer physician visits for minor ailments in one Scottish pilot project. More smart spending.  

Pharmacy healthcare teams also help the growing number of older Canadians manage their diabetes, hypertension and other chronic conditions, and deal with challenges like obesity, smoking, nutrition and exercise.

Research shows that treating patients appropriately in pharmacies saves our healthcare system at least $2 billion annually. (See http://9000pointsofcare.ca/).

There are more than nine thousand neighbourhood pharmacies across Canada, embedded in almost every community, providing a growing range of primary care services.

High quality, easily accessed healthcare for Canadians is possible, practical and affordable; its foundation is neighbourhood pharmacies, where patients and their needs come first."

About Neighbourhood Pharmacies

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) is the respected voice and advocate for the business of pharmacy in Canada, representing the owners and operators of Canada's leading drug store brands and serving Canadians through chain, banner and franchised neighbourhood pharmacies, as well as grocery chains and mass merchandisers with pharmacies.

SOURCE Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

For further information: Allan Austin, Director, Communications, 416 226 9100 ext 4012, aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

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Posted Jan 6, 2016

Denise Carpenter Delivers Pharmacy Outlook 2016 in Chain Drug Review

Chain Drug Review, News
Denise Carpenter Delivers Pharmacy Outlook 2016 in Chain Drug Review
The last year has seen ongoing, large-scale change in the pharmacy industry in Canada, and 2016 will be no different, according to Denise Carpenter in this month’s Chain Drug Review.

The last year has seen continuing seismic change for Canadian pharmacy, and 2016 appears set to continue this trend. Our industry’s business model is reinventing itself, from one based on product distribution and transactions to one focusing on an ongoing professional relationship between the pharmacy health care team and individual patients, in which pharmacy delivers a growing range of health care services to keep Canadians healthier longer. For those who can successfully navigate this period of change, there are huge opportunities to build a sustainable business.

 

Click the link below to read more about the opportunities for pharmacy in 2016 in Chain Drug Review:

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News
Posted Jan 5, 2016

MPP Eleanor McMahon Gets Her Flu Shot

Burlington, Ontario
Expanded Scope of Practice, Healthcare Closer to Home, Flu Shot, News, Walmart
MPP Eleanor McMahon Gets Her Flu Shot
It may have been a little later than she usually gets her shot, but better late than never for MPP Eleanor McMahon, who got her shot on December 16 at the Walmart Pharmacy…

Burlington, Ontario

It may have been a little later than she usually gets her shot, but better late than never for MPP Eleanor McMahon, who got her shot on December 16 at the Walmart Pharmacy on Fairview Street. According to the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, Canadians love getting their flu vaccinations at a pharmacy due to the speed and convenience. You can walk in without an appointment, fill out a quick form, get the shot and continue shopping. Learn more at healthcareclosertohome.ca

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News
Posted Jan 5, 2016

Healthcare Closer to Home with MPP Mitzie Hunter

Scarborough, Ontario
Expanded Scope of Practice, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Walmart
Healthcare Closer to Home with MPP Mitzie Hunter
MPP Mitzie Hunter joined the Healthcare Closer to Home pharmacy tour at Walmart in Cedarbrae Plaza…

https://scarborough.snapd.com/event/900217#/

Scarborough, ON

MPP Mitzie Hunter joined the Healthcare Closer to Home pharmacy tour at Walmart in Cedarbrae Plaza. The tour was a part of Neighbourhood Pharmacies Healthcare Closer to Home initiative, which aims to highlight the patient and healthcare system benefits of expanded pharmacy services. They also shared their patient satisfaction with pharmacy flu shots research at the event.

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News
Posted Dec 2, 2015

Pharmacies Showcased By MPP

Bayfield, ON
Expanded Scope of Practice, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Pharmasave
Pharmacies Showcased By MPP
Pharmacists across our province are offering more services, and Huron-Bruce Tory MPP Lisa Thompson learned about them while getting her flu shot during a visit to Michael's Pharmasave in Bayfield…

http://www.1049thebeach.ca/news_item.php?NewsID=79365

By: Peter Jackson

Bayfield, ON

Pharmacists across our province are offering more services, and Huron-Bruce Tory MPP Lisa Thompson learned about them while getting her flu shot during a visit to Michael's Pharmasave in Bayfield.

Thompson's tour Wednesday was a way of showcasing the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada's "Healthcare Closer to Home" program.

Provincial regulations passed in 2012 allow pharmacists to administer flu shots, which 650,000 Ontarians took advantage of last year.

They can also renew and adapt prescriptions, provide smoking cessation materials and counselling and wellness counselling.

The Association would like to see member pharmacists expand services to include prescribing for common ailments, and delivery of additional injections and vaccines.

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News
Posted Dec 2, 2015

MPP Jennifer French Learns About Pharmacy Patient Services

Oshawa, ON
Expanded Scope of Practice, Lovell Drugs, News, Ontario, Healthcare Closer to Home
MPP Jennifer French Learns About Pharmacy Patient Services
On October 30, MPP Jennifer French stopped by the Lovell Drugs in downtown Oshawa for a pharmacy tour and to learn more about the expanded scope of practice for pharmacists and how these new services have been important to patients…

https://oshawa.snapd.com/event/891001#/

Oshawa, ON

On October 30, MPP Jennifer French stopped by the Lovell Drugs in downtown Oshawa for a pharmacy tour and to learn more about the expanded scope of practice for pharmacists and how these new services have been important to patients. This was all part of Healthcare Closer to Home, an initiative that works to promote the delivery of professional healthcare from neighbourhood pharmacies and encouraging Canadians to get to know their neighbourhood pharmacy team. Provincial governments across Canada have been increasing pharmacist scope of practice - including allowing pharmacists to administer flu shots. Last year, a large number of Canadians used a pharmacy flu vaccination because of its speed and convenience. Most were able to walk in without an appointment and wait less than 10 minutes for their vaccination.

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News
Posted Nov 24, 2015

More Than a Shot in the Arm

Flu Shot, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Pharmasave
Pharmasave Michael’s Pharmacy was a busy place on the afternoon of Nov. 11 when members of the Huron County media descended on the business to watch Pharmacist Michael Ibrahim administer a flu shot to MPP Lisa Thompson…

http://cc.villageofbayfield.com/Members/BayfieldBreeze/Week47Issue333/tabid/751/Default.aspx

Bayfield, ON

Pharmasave Michael’s Pharmacy was a busy place on the afternoon of Nov. 11 when members of the Huron County media descended on the business to watch Pharmacist Michael Ibrahim administer a flu shot to MPP Lisa Thompson. Jessica Behnke communications officer with the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada was also in attendance to assist in the promotion of their "Healthcare Closer to Home" program. Ontario pharmacists have been allowed to give flu shots since 2012 and it is a program that more members of the public are taking advantage of. The Bayfield pharmacy administered 600 shots during the 2014 flu season. To date for 2015 they have delivered 400 shots this year. Flu shots are just one of the services that local pharmacies offer from lifestyle and diabetes management to smoking cessation programs. It is the eventual goal that emergency room visits will be reduced as pharmacists become more able to enhance front line care. (Photo by Melody Falconer-Pounder)

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News
Posted Nov 24, 2015

Pharmacies Involved in Healthcare Closer to Home

Pharmasave, Healthcare Closer to Home, Flu Shot, News, Ontario
Pharmacies Involved in Healthcare Closer to Home
Michael’s Pharmasave in Bayfield is one of the many locations that took part in the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Healthcare Closer to Home program…

By: Bob Monto

Bayfield, ON

Michael’s Pharmasave in Bayfield was one of the many locations that took part in the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Healthcare Closer to Home program.

Neighbourhood Pharmacy Communications specialist Jessica Behnke explains the goal of the program is to promote services provided by local pharmacies that most people are not aware of – and particularly this time of year, the flu shot.

The Healthcare Closer to Home program is also an effort to lobby the government to allow pharmacies to provide more services.

Michael Ibrahim of Michael’s in Bayfield points out they offer a wide range of assistance for diabetic and geriatric patients, which can reduce visits to emergency rooms and save money for the healthcare system.

Ibrahim adds an annual review of patient’s prescriptions, flu shots and travel vaccines are just part of the services that pharmacies can provide.  That can reduce wait times at a doctor’s office as well as take pressure off hospital emergency rooms.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Nov 13, 2015

Putting Patients at the Centre, Being Part of the Solution Keys to Industry Future

Montreal, Quebec
Government Relations, News, Pharmacy Industry, Quebec

PUTTING PATIENTS AT THE CENTRE, BEING PART OF THE SOLUTION KEYS TO INDUSTRY FUTURE

MONTREAL, November 13, 2015 – Despite government cutbacks and other major challenges, the future of the pharmacy industry in Canada remains firmly founded on putting the patient at the centre of every business activity, and finding ways to be part – always – of the solution to the challenges facing the healthcare delivery system, according to Denise Carpenter, President and Chief Executive of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, speaking today at the annual congress of the Association québécoise des pharmaciens propriétaires (AQPP).

Carpenter pointed out that following the early rounds of government funding cuts, industry reaction was fast and furious, but accomplished nothing. Instead, she said, learning how to become part of the solution, the broader pharmacy industry collaborated on research and published a seminal policy paper, "9000 Points of Care: Improving Access to Affordable Healthcare." The paper detailed five creative strategies to achieve better patient care, better patient health outcomes and better (lower) costs, by making more complete use of pharmacy’s capabilities.

This document puts patients at the centre and becoming "part of the solution" helped governments recognize the important role the pharmacy industry could play as a partner, she said, and this helped lead to an invitation from Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care to participate in discussions on implementing further changes.

"These discussions weren’t in any sense a negotiation," said Carpenter, "But we were at the table and helped mitigate the impact for our members and the whole industry. You can’t do that without a constructive, professional, trust-based relationship."

Carpenter also stressed the importance of strong industry representation, noting, "Instead of having multiple organizations all competing for access and attention, governments and other Page2

stakeholders can deal meaningfully with a single point of contact that transcends any individual company’s competitive interests. That makes real progress possible on even the most contentious matters."

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) is the respected voice and advocate for the business of pharmacy.

We represent the owners and operators of the country’s leading drug store brands, serving Canadians through chain, banner and franchised neighbourhood pharmacies, as well as grocers and mass merchandisers with pharmacies. We also represent the leading retail buying and banner groups serving independent pharmacies. Pharmacy suppliers – including pharmaceutical manufacturers, technology companies, data specialists, marketing companies and consultants – also participate in the organization as associates. In all, our members operate at about 4,500 locations, and that represents about half of the 9,000 neighbourhood pharmacies in Canada.

Further Information:

Allan Austin, Director, Communications

416 226 9100 ext. 4012

647 465 7596

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

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News
Posted Nov 12, 2015

Better health care in Durham is right in your neighbourhood

Healthcare Closer to Home, News
Better health care in Durham is right in your neighbourhood
Click through to read an opinion editorial by Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada’s President and CEO Denise Carpenter

http://www.durhamregion.com/community-story/6046466-better-health-care-in-durham-is-right-in-your-neighbourhood/

Canadians are used to thinking of their health-care system as “great,” and many of us are passionately proud of it when we think about other countries.

But there are troubling signs that due to our rapidly aging population and rising costs, the current system may not be sustainable. Beyond the baby boomers starting to retire, the approaching “silver tsunami” will see seniors account for 25 per cent of our population in 2036, compared to just 14 per cent today.

Recent months have seen a flurry of new reports and white papers suggesting Canadians would be better served by a new national pharmacare program. Too often, however, these proposals -- many of which raise valuable ideas -- focus primarily on cutting drug costs, when the real heart of health care is patients and their access to care. Yes, the costs have to be managed, but focusing first on better patient care and better patient outcomes will help alleviate some of our biggest health-care delivery challenges.

The neighbourhood pharmacy industry’s vision is to ensure that patients are at the centre of everything we do -- including all discussions about improving our health-care system.

There are about 9,000 neighbourhood pharmacies across Canada, embedded in almost every community, providing a growing range of primary care services, closer to where Canadians live, work and play. Many neighbourhood pharmacies are open to midnight, and some even 24 hours, so patients and their families can get care when and how it’s convenient for them, often without an appointment.

This flexibility enables patients to deal with minor health issues and prevent them from becoming more distressing, more complex and more costly to treat. Pharmacy health-care teams also help patients manage their chronic conditions, like diabetes and hypertension, can help you quit smoking and deal with challenges like obesity, nutrition and exercise, which help Canadians live longer, healthier lives.

Treating Canadians in neighbourhood pharmacies isn’t a completely new idea, as more than 1.9 million of us now get our annual flu vaccinations there, a number that’s growing because of the speed and convenience. Pharmacy flu vaccinations also attract some patients not vaccinated last season, which shows neighbourhood pharmacy’s ability to deliver important health-care services that benefit the whole population.

Pharmacies also help patients get the most from their medications -- by ensuring they are taking the most effective medications for their conditions, helping them take their medications when and how prescribed, guarding against adverse drug reactions and counselling patients taking new medications.

Canadians rely on their own insurance and governments to fund most medications, but pharmacies provide the hands-on patient care. Canadians know they can rely on their neighbourhood pharmacies to be there, to provide care where and when it’s needed, according to the patient’s convenience. That’s our commitment.

Denise Carpenter is president and CEO of the Neighbourhood Pharmacies Association of Canada.

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News
Posted Nov 12, 2015

Durham Flu Article Highlights Neighbourhood Pharmacies Research

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario
Durham Flu Article Highlights Neighbourhood Pharmacies Research
According to research conducted by the Neighbourhood Pharmacies Association of Canada for the 2014-2015 season, a growing number of Canadians are opting to receive their flu shot at their local pharmacy due to speed and convenience…

By: Parvaneh Pessian

DURHAM -- Durham Region’s health department has launched its annual influenza vaccination campaign, encouraging members of the public to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting the flu shot.

The campaign was launched Monday with information about quadrivalent flu vaccines, which are also publicly funded this year for children and adolescents from six months up to 17 years of age. Quadrivalent flu vaccines offer protection against an extra B-strain of the flu virus that affects youth more frequently than adults.

There are two types of quadrivalent flu vaccines: the type given by injection and FluMist Quadrivalent, given by nasal spray. FluMist Quadrivalent is available for children and adolescents ages 2-17. The flu vaccine for adults will remain available in an injectable form, with protection against the three flu viruses most likely to circulate during the flu season.

“The typical (flu) season is October until April so we encourage people to get vaccinated as soon as possible,” said Ashley Wilson, public health nurse at the Region of Durham.

The flu is a respiratory infection caused by influenza A or B viruses, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. Symptoms typically include the sudden onset of headache, chills, cough, fever, loss of appetite, myalgia, fatigue, coryza, sneezing, watery eyes and throat irritation. Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea may also occur, especially in children.

Every year, 10 to 20 per cent of Canadians get sick with the flu. While most people recover within a week to 10 days, some -- such as those 65 years of age and older, and adults and children with chronic conditions -- are at higher risk of more severe complications. It’s estimated that upwards of 12,000 Canadians are hospitalized and about 3,500 die as a result of the flu each year.

“Even though a lot of us get the flu, I think we sometimes forget that people can have serious complications ... so it’s important for all of us to get the shot,” explained Ms. Wilson.

“(For the) elderly and young children and people with chronic health conditions, it can lead to complications such as pneumonia and in some severe cases, death. So, we’re preventing the spread by getting the flu shot and preventing the illness in ourselves.”

Last year was a particularly bad year for the flu in Durham. From Aug. 30, 2014 to Aug. 28, 2015, there were 421 laboratory confirmed flu cases in the region -- up from 317 in the 2013-2014 season.

Ms. Wilson attributes the increase to the type of strains that were circulating. Each year the flu vaccine is created in the spring and manufactured in the summer for distribution in the fall. If the virus mutates between spring and fall, it’s less effective.

“It’s kind of hard to tell what we’re going to see this year because it changes every year,” she said.

“The circulating strains are different because the virus unfortunately mutates a lot so it’s too early to tell what’s going to be circulating here until we start getting confirmed cases.”

When the flu vaccine is well matched to circulating viruses, it can be between 60 to 80 per cent effective, she added.

“On average, over the years when you look at it, it’s 50 per cent effective but when you’re looking at how many people are affected by influenza, that’s still a good rate and still important to get (the flu shot).”

The flu vaccine will be widely available in Durham through local health care providers, as well as participating pharmacies that will administer the flu shot to those over the age of five. The Region’s health department is not offering community flu shot clinics this year due to decreased attendance numbers in previous years, likely resulting from greater public access to other vaccination providers.

According to research conducted by the Neighbourhood Pharmacies Association of Canada for the 2014-2015 season, a growing number of Canadians are opting to receive their flu shot at their local pharmacy due to speed and convenience. Ninety per cent of survey respondents walked in without an appointment and 88 per cent reported waiting less than 10 minutes for their vaccination. Seventy-one per cent of respondents said they chose the pharmacy because of its convenient location.

“The success of the pharmacy flu vaccination program has important public health impacts that result in more Canadians being protected against this underestimated disease,” said Denise Carpenter, president and CEO of Neighbourhood Pharmacies.

“That means fewer people suffering, reduced health care costs resulting from hospitalizations and reduced economic losses from time away from work, including deaths.”

More than half of those who received a flu vaccination at a pharmacy last season were also new to the experience. Twenty per cent of those surveyed hadn’t received a flu vaccination the previous season and 29 per cent had switched to getting the shot at a pharmacy compared to other vaccination providers.

To find the flu shot clinic closest to you, visit www.ontario.ca/page/flu-clinics . For more information about the flu, visit www.durham.ca/flu or call the Durham Health Connection Line at 905-666-6241 or 1-800-841-2729.


HOW THIS IMPACTS YOU

• The flu is a serious respiratory illness that affects 10 to 20 per cent of Canadians every year. An estimated 12,200 Canadians are hospitalized and about 3,500 die as a result of the flu each year.

• Individuals who are considered at high risk of complications from the flu include young children, adults over 65, adults in long-term care homes, pregnant women and people with chronic illnesses such as heart, lung, kidney, liver, blood or metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, or weakened immune systems.

• Laboratory confirmed cases of flu in Durham have increased in recent years. There were 421 cases in the 2014-2015 season, 317 cases in the 2013-2014 season, 250 cases in the 2012-2013 season, and 111 cases in the 2011-2012 season.

• The flu spreads easily through coughing, sneezing and direct contact with unwashed hands, surfaces, or objects that have been in contact with the flu virus. Flu germs from sneezes can travel up to six feet, and the flu can live on surfaces for up to eight hours. If infected with the flu, it can be transmitted to others a day before symptoms appear. Individuals with the flu are also contagious for seven days or longer after their symptoms have resolved.

• As of Oct. 26, a nasal spray flu vaccine is available for children and youth ages 2-17 as an alternative to an injection in the arm. The spray vaccine will offer greater protection against four flu viruses instead of three. The added protection comes against an additional B-strain of the flu virus, which affects children and adolescents more frequently than adults. Parents still have the option to vaccinate their children using an injection, which is available for children ages six months to 17 and also protects against the same four viruses as the new nasal spray.

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News
Posted Sep 15, 2015

Flu shot is just one of several new services pharmacists can perform

North York,ON
HCCH, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, North Yorl
Flu shot is just one of several new services pharmacists can perform
Most people are aware Ontario pharmacists can now administer the flu shot, but that’s just one of a number of new services people can access at a local pharmacy…

http://www.insidetoronto.com/news-story/5841345-flu-shot-is-just-one-of-several-new-services-pharmacists-can-perform/

Yorkgate IDA, North York ON

By:Dominik Kurek

Most people are aware Ontario pharmacists can now administer the flu shot. In fact, 650,000 Ontario residents took them up on that offer in 2014.

But, that’s just one of a number of new services people can access at a local pharmacy following a number of regulation changes by the provincial government.

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada stopped by the Yorkgate IDA Friday, Sept. 11 to help highlight some of the new services available at this pharmacy and at thousands more across Ontario.

The new regulations are a way to help people access health care closer to home.

Pharmacists can now:

• Administer flu shots

• Provide smoking cessation counselling and prescribe medications to support patients who want to quit smoking

• Provide MedsCheck medication reviews, at no charge for eligible patients (a one-on-one meeting between patient and pharmacist to review medications to ensure they are safe and effective)

• Adapt and renew prescriptions (if a doctor can’t be reached on time)

• Help patients meet their health and wellness goals by providing information and support

“Our traditional work has been dispensing, behind the counter. This allows me to come out of the counter and interact with patients,” said Daks Amin, Yorkgate IDA owner.

“Because we’re located close to a Family Health Team, I can look at some of the lab results, I can work out risk factors for patients. It’s a very good feature the government has included.”

Amin can conduct hypertension clinics (for people with high blood pressure), which allows him to fine tune medicine dosages. He said this is helpful with chronic disease management, which is particularly important for an aging population.

“As the population is aging, patients have issues with adhering to medication, issues with compliance. For example, blood pressure tablets, whether or not you take them, you pretty much feel the same,” he said. “We have to constantly encourage them to keep taking those. If they’re forgetting, we can package their medication in blister packs for better compliance.”

If a doctor can’t be reached on time, pharmacists can renew prescriptions on a short-term basis, and adapt it to benefit the patient. For example, if a doctor prescribes tablets and the patient has trouble swallowing them, the pharmacist can change the prescription to liquid.

York West MPP Mario Sergio came out for the tour and said making these new services available at pharmacies is part of the government’s efforts to make access to health care easier. It is also more cost effective and frees up time at doctor’s offices and hospitals.

Sergio said he’s disheartened when he hears seniors say they don’t plan to get a flu shot. However, he admits changing family situations or problems with mobility can make it hard for a person to see their doctor who may be a drive away.

“As a senior, you may not want to do that all the time,” he said. “It depends on the situation. So, when you’re in the neighbourhood and you can walk to (the pharmacy), it’s a different story.”

According to the Ontario Pharmacists Association, 85 per cent of Ontario’s residents live within two kilometres of a pharmacy. Some pharmacies are also open 24 hours a day.

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News
Posted Jul 21, 2015

From the Desk of the CEO

Communications, Committees, Conference, From the Desk of the CEO, Membership, Ontario
Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada - From the Desk of the CEO

From the Desk of the CEO

Canada is often said to be blessed with four distinct seasons and one of the best things about our Canadian summer is that it’s such a delightful contrast from the tough sledding we endure for much of the rest of the year. The warmest weather of the year also brings the start of our annual planning process for the coming calendar year, which continues toward the Board’s consideration of the 2016 work plan at its October 1 meeting. Like the changing seasons, business planning is ongoing and ever-changing – constantly seeking to anticipate and respond to changes in the environment that will affect our members. Whatever the season and whatever the weather, the work of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada continues with the sole focus of advancing our members’ businesses, a small part of which is described below. I hope for you and your family that the livin’ is easy and I look forward to connecting with you again next month. Denise Carpenter, ICD. D President and Chief Executive Officer    Advisory Committees Named and Begin Work

The new advisory groups, announced in the last edition of From the Desk and elsewhere, have now been staffed and are holding their first meetings in July. The Industry & Business Advisory Committee voting members are comprised of:

Michael Nashat                                   OnPharm

Chi Quon                                             Overwaitea

Carmen Churcott                                Pharmasave Drugs (National)

Russell Cohen (Co-Chair)                 Rexall

Steve J. Lee                                       Walmart Canada

Rob Loney                                         Johnson & Johnson

Jaiveer Singh                                    Mint Pharmaceuticals

Mark Legault                                     Pfizer Canada

Kimberley Schroeder                        Pharmascience Canada

Michael Sine                                     Teva Canada

The Membership & Events Advisory Committee voting members comprise:

Judy Roberts                                      Calgary Co-operative Association

David Simmonds                                McKesson Canada

Elaine Akers                                       Medical Pharmacies Group

Alvin Kochar                                       Metro Ontario

Sandra Hanna                                    OnPharm

Dean Miller (Co-Chair)                       Remedy Holdings

Erik Botines                                        Rexall

Taj Dhinsa                                          Walmart Canada

Geoff Johnson                                   Apotex

Jason Frame                                      Jamp Pharma

Carol MacDonald                               Pfizer Canada

Council of Federation Meeting & Upcoming Election Propel Pharmacare Discussions

The Council of the Federation meeting this week in St.John’s has provided a window for associations, organizations and media to continue discussions about pharmacare.

Two new polls released this week show widespread support among Canadians for a national pharmacare program that would cover the cost of prescription drugs. However, the Angus Reid study (here) found no consensus on the details or funding of such a program, and reveals Canadians do not necessarily see this issue as a priority over other healthcare issues. Additionally, the Abacus Data survey (here) shows the majority of Canadians are concerned about costs, administration and the impact on their current coverage.

The Globe and Mail obtained a summary document of the health ministers’ meeting convened by Ontario’s Dr. Eric Hoskins in Toronto last month. The document notes there will be “losers” in the creation of a national drug program – the private health industry and the pharmacy industry. Read the full article and more details of the discussions here.

The Association continues to closely monitor discussions on the topic of a national prescription drug program, and to execute and fine tune our strategy.

Annual Conference Presentations Posted Online

The speaker line-up at our Annual Conference in Quebec City this year was one of our most thought-provoking and stimulating to date. I am pleased to announce that the presentations are available online at our members-only site.

Some of the presentations available include:

  • Michael Law, Community Pharmacy and Pharmacare: For-patient or for-profit?
  • Mike Boivin, Differentiating and Optimizing your Pharmacy
  • Vincent van der Heijden, Insights from the 2015 Advantage Mirror Report

Login to our members-only site at http://www.myneighbourhoodpharmacies.ca/ to access the presentations.

Update on Research

Neighbourhood Pharmacies has several research projects underway:

Pharmacy 360o – The field work has been completed for this comprehensive look at the business of retail pharmacy in Canada, and the analysis is underway.  Members who participated in the survey can expect customized reports for their organization in September.  By the end of September, you can also look forward to an industry level report that promises to become an indispensable guide to Canadian retail pharmacy.

Immunization Patient Satisfaction – Individual benchmark results for participating members have been rolling out over the past few weeks. Solid results were obtained from more than 1,600 questionnaires completed and submitted. This research documents very strong patient support for the pharmacy flu shot experience, and it has already proven to be particularly useful for members planning next year’s flu shot campaigns and considering how to convert new patients into loyal customers.

Opinion/Attitude Research – In the field at the end of this month is a brief polling of Canadians attitudes and impressions of pharmacy.  Results from this survey will be used to support the National Patient Safety Consultations.

National Patient Safety Roundtable Meetings Set for August

Following the Patient Safety Executive Roundtable in March, the round of operational group meetings is set to kick off in August, with working sessions in Halifax, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. These meetings are intended to advance the three major ideas generated in the executive session, combine them with the current experience of front line pharmacy personnel, and to generate, ultimately, a set of guiding principles and best practices which can be implemented or adopted in every neighbourhood pharmacy in Canada. In the working group meetings participants will be using work books generated from the output of the Executive Roundtable session.  This round will also include two webinars to gather additional patient safety ideas and opportunities.

The working group outputs will be collected and consolidated by Neighbourhood Pharmacies staff and presented to the Board for approval at its October 1 meeting.

Ontario Budget Implementation Table Update

As previously indicated in the From the Desk June 19, and other communications, Neighbourhood Pharmacies is committed to keeping members informed of the progress of discussions with the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care and the Ontario Pharmacists Association (OPA) on the timing and implementation of underlying policy changes required to achieve the objectives of the 2015 Ontario provincial budget.

The initial meeting of the Implementation Table was held May 25, and the Implementation Table follow-up is scheduled for next week. Neighbourhood Pharmacies and the OPA will present the views and considerations of the three working groups to the Ministry. Changes are targeting October 1, 2015 implementation.

Please direct all comments, questions or concerns to Justin Bates, Vice President, Pharmacy and Professional Affairs, at jbates@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca.

New Dosage Limits for Acetaminophen

Following a significant and unexpected increase in the number of unintended overdoses, Health Canada announced July 9 that it is considering lowering the recommended daily maximum dosages of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen is used in nearly 500 products, and overdoses are said to account for more than 4,000 hospitalizations in Canada annually.

Neighbourhood Pharmacies has been actively involved on this file, working with Health Canada and other stakeholders to develop patient-friendly language to enhance consumer awareness of the product’s common inclusion in self-care remedies and outlining the potential dangers of acetaminophen overdoses. 

Neighbourhood Pharmacies Connects with Brazilian Pharmacy Association

On June 22, 2015 I had the honour and pleasure to meet with and address a delegation from Abrafarma, the Brazilian trade association representing retail pharmacy in that country. Abrafarma is actively studying retail pharmacy operations in a number of countries.

Abrafarma was established in 1991, bringing together 29 of the largest pharmacy chains and drugstores in Brazil, with 5,243 stores in the  26 Brazilian states and Federal District, with more than 114,000 employees (including about 14,200 pharmacists). Abrafarma chains and drugstores posted annual sales of approximately US$12.8 billion, amounting to a market share of approximately 40 per cent.

Like Neighbourhood Pharmacies, Abrafarma’s mandate addresses increasing the scope of services in pharmacies (basic and routine health tests, immunizations), increasing involvement in patient treatment and helping reduce the overall cost of healthcare.

News
Posted Jul 10, 2015

MPP Hoggarth on hand for tour of Barrie pharmacy

Rexall Barrie, ON
Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Barrie
MPP Hoggarth on hand for tour of Barrie pharmacy
MPP Hoggarth helped demonstrate a blood-pressure test, something Leung does often for patients. The pharmacy also hosts clinics where patients can walk in for a blood pressure or blood glucose test.

As a part of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada's Healthcare Closer to Home campaign, pharmacist and pharmacy manager Janet Leung gave Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth a tour of the Rexall pharmacy, and shared details about the range of patient services pharmacists provide, on Friday morning.

In 2012, Ontario passed regulations enabling pharmacists to deliver minor treatments and counselling to patients in their communities. These changes mean that pharmacists can now administer flu shots, initiate therapies for smoking cessation, demonstrate how to administer injection or inhalation prescriptions, provide wellness counselling and support for chronic conditions, as well as refill or adapt prescriptions.

Hoggarth helped demonstrate a blood-pressure test, something Leung does often for patients. The pharmacy also hosts clinics where patients can walk in for a blood pressure or blood glucose test.

The expanded scope of practice means pharmacists can use their expertise to provide on the spot treatment and guidance to patients.

Leung says there is still more pharmacists could do, such as administer other routine vaccines beyond the flu shot, as well as prescribe for common ailments, like cold sores or back pain.

Health Minister Eric Hoskins announced in the spring that the Ontario government is currently considering adding additional vaccinations to pharmacists' services. 

1 Attachments
News
Posted Jun 23, 2015

2015 Annual Conference & New Pharmacy Expo Speaker Presentations

Quebec City
2015 Conference Guide, Conference, Quebec City
We are pleased to announce that the presentations from our Annual Conference 2015 – “Game Changers” – are available online.

Insights from the 2015 Advantage Mirrior Report, Vincent van der Heijden

Community Pharmacy and Pharmacare: For-patient or for-profit?, Michael Law

Differentiating and Optimizing your Pharmacy, Mike Boivin

Disease Screening in the Community - The Business Case for Pharmacists, Iris Krawchenko

Le virtuose du temps dans une pharmacie: comment gagner de 3 à 5 heures par semaine dans un monde technologique, Frederic Simard

Les couleurs de la communication, Michael Zarbatany-Hamel

Performance d'équipe, Michael Zarbatany-Hamel

Tiers Payeurs, Johanne Fortier 

Third Party Payors, Peter Zawadzki 

The Pharmacist's Influence in Self-Care, Vicki Wood

La Pharmacie: une vision d'affaires clinique, Isabelle Tremblay

11 Attachments
2015 Conference
Posted Mar 13, 2015

Quick-thinking pharmacist saves man’s life

Healthcare Closer to Home, Expanded Scope of Practise, News, Nova Scotia
Quick-thinking pharmacist saves man’s life
Michelle Stewart, a pharmacist who hosted a Neighbourhood Pharmacies’ Healthcare Closer to Home pharmacy tour in December 2014, made headlines in Nova Scotia for her quick thinking that may have saved a patient’s life.

A Nova Scotia senior says a blood pressure machine and a quick-thinking pharmacist may have just saved his life.

Anse MacDonald had never used a pharmacy blood pressure machine until Feb. 28, when he stopped at the pharmacy at the Sobeys store on New Glasgow’s west side.

“There was a lineup and instead of doing something else, I saw this machine and I decided I’d, for the hell of it, give it a go,” says MacDonald.

The machine has guidelines for high readings and MacDonald noticed his numbers were pushing those limits.

Some pharmacies offer extra services, so the pharmacist behind the counter took MacDonald to a private room for a more accurate reading.

Michelle Stewart says she grew concerned as his pressure continued to rise.

“It wasn’t only high, but he really was asymptomatic,” says Stewart. “He felt really well and as I repeated the measurement it continued to increase, so that was concerning.”

Stewart called 911 and, despite mild protest, MacDonald agreed to be taken to hospital by ambulance.

“The tightness he felt around his abdomen was now more like a pain in his chest, so at that point, 911 had already been called and the ambulance was already on the way, but it was kind of extra reassurance that the phone call needed to be made,” says Stewart.

“If she hadn’t been busy I wouldn’t have bothered with my blood pressure,” says MacDonald. “Who knows what would have happened?”

MacDonald says his readings at the hospital were 200 over 180, and he ended up spending two days there. Now he jokes that Stewart’s quick-thinking and decisive action kept him out of the funeral home.

“If she wasn’t here, if she hadn’t have been here or she hadn’t taken care of me, I’d be up at Bob Porter’s [Funeral Home],” he says.

“I’m very grateful that Anse is OK and even more grateful that, you know, that I got to help him,” says Stewart.

With files from CTV Atlantic's Dan MacIntosh

1 Attachments
News
Posted Mar 6, 2015

The people in your neighbourhood

Ottawa, ON
Healthcare Closer to Home, Ontario, News
The people in your neighbourhood
Ottawa South MPP John Fraser speaks with Kelly Crotty, pharmacist at Medical Pharmacy
1 Attachments
News
Posted Feb 6, 2015

Pharmacy 360° - 2015 Insight Survey

Survey, Pharmacy 360°-2015 Insight Survey, PwC
Maintain and increase influence with key stakeholders, position the association as a influencer and thought leader to inform public policy and strategic direction by publishing an annual bellwether industry report

To access the Pharmacy 360o - PwC Pharmacy Retailer Survey please go to:

neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca/survey

neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca/sondage

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada “Pharmacy 360o – 2015 Insight Report,” powered by PricewaterhouseCoopers, has now launched, with the start of data gathering on Thursday, February 5,

The final report will be delivered in two components – a high-level perspective on the industry as a whole, and, a summary of findings for participating individual pharmacies The survey results will provide the Association with the foundational data to support advocacy initiatives and advance the business of pharmacy as an integral hub of patient care, closer to where Canadians live, work and play.

The online survey’s questions collect information in four broad categories: demographics; dispensing; patient services; and, front shop/OTC. When collected and analyzed, the data will provide a comprehensive and up-to-date map of the Canadian retail pharmacy landscape.     

We expect that the survey will be in the field for approximately four weeks. Depending on the participation rate, the final report is scheduled to be published before the Association’s Annual Conference in mid-May.

For further information on the survey and “2015 Insight Report,” please contact: Anthony Silva (asilva@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca) or Rob McCord (rmccord@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca).

 

Looking forward to your participation!

 

1 Attachments
General Resources
Posted Jan 23, 2015

Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada Position on Patient Safety

Communications, CBC, Issues, Media, Patient Safety, Retail pharmacy
Website response to CBC Marketplace - Patient health and safety is our top priority. Our members are committed, professional and engaged, working hard every day to advance the health and well-being of Canadians and their communities.

 

Website Response to CBC Marketplace

Patient health and safety is our top priority. Our members are committed, professional and engaged, working hard every day to advance the health and well-being of Canadians and their communities.

While we work hard to deliver quality care, we know there is always room to do better.

Recent reports of errors and deviations from standards of practice are concerning, and certainly do not meet our members’ expectations. We take all incidents, errors and deviations from standards of practice very seriously. Our members, working to complement the role of the provincial Colleges, have systems and processes in place for review and investigation. Where warranted, remedial action is taken.

We are also working to help make pharmacy even safer. We’re collaborating on multiple initiatives – such as a national medication errors database and accelerated implementation of ePrescribing and eHealth technologies – with multiple stakeholders, including the Canadian Pharmacists’ Association (CPhA) and its provincial counterparts, the professional colleges, governments, and patient and industry associations, all to improve healthcare outcomes and enhance patient safety.

To help focus broader pharmacy community attention and resources on improving healthcare outcomes and patient safety, Neighbourhood Pharmacies will convene Pharmacy Patient Safety discussions, to which all key stakeholders and interested parties will be welcome. Our goal will be to identify obstacles but more importantly, to come together and take action where we can. A real commitment to patient safety demands no less.

Our pharmacy teams remain the most accessible healthcare practitioners to Canadians when and where they need pharmacy services. We encourage Canadians to get to know their neighborhood pharmacy team, to help them get the most out of their care.

This is our commitment and we are the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada.

 

1 Attachments
News
Posted Jan 16, 2015

Healthcare Closer to Home Pharmacy Tour

Whitby, Ontario
Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario
Healthcare Closer to Home Pharmacy Tour
MPP Christine Elliott was snapd at Lovell Drugs in late November while getting her flu shot.

MPP Christine Elliott was snapd at Lovell Drugs in late November while getting her flu shot. The visit was part of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada’s Healthcare Closer to Home initiative, which aims to highlight the patient benefits of expanded scope of practice for pharmacists. Recently a bill was passed expanding the scope of practice for pharmacists in Ontario, and enabling them to provide more patient services - like flu shots. To learn more on how neighbourhood pharmacies are improving access to affordable healthcare, visit www.9000pointsofcare.com.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Jan 16, 2015

Pharmacists deliver healthcare closer to home in Kingston

Kingston, ON
Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario
Pharmacists deliver healthcare closer to home in Kingston
MPP Sophie Kiwala visited the Medical Arts Pharmacy to see how pharmacists are helping our community

As part of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada’s Healthcare Closer to Home initiative, MPP Sophie Kiwala visited the Medical Arts Pharmacy to see how these benefits are helping our community receive quality, convenient care, closer to home. As you may know, a Bill was recently passed that expanded the scope of practice for pharmacists in Ontario, enabling them to provide more patient services - like flu shots - thereby enhancing access to care and helping to deliver healthcare closer to home. The visit was very informative for all those in attendance. For more information, go to 9000pointsofcare.com

1 Attachments
News
Posted Dec 17, 2014

More expanded role for pharmacists

Alberta, Healthcare Closer to Home, News
More expanded role for pharmacists
Jocelyne Grise, the manager of the Safeway Pharmacy in Lloydminster, said that the Closer to Home initiative can improve the lives of residents in rural communities like Lloydminster.

http://www.lloydminstersource.com/articles/article/2014-12-16-more-expanded-role-for-pharmacists-npa#.VJHWQM85CUl

Safeway, Lloydminster AB

By Christopher Bown

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association (NPA) of Canada is promoting its Closer to Home initiative, which aims to expand the range of services that pharmacists can provide to customers.

Jocelyne Grise, the manager of the Safeway Pharmacy in Lloydminster, said that the Closer to Home initiative can improve the lives of residents in rural communities like Lloydminster.

“We have a lot of patients that find it difficult to get to into their physicians and this way we are able to ensure that the patients are compliant with this medication, and their health care is going to be addressed and make sure that their supply of medication is there as well,” she said.

Healthcare Closer to Home showcases services to the public and encourages government officials to continue increasing pharmacist scope of practice where appropriate, according to the NPA.

“We do an assessment of the patient, the ensure that it’s safe for us to continue on with the medication,” said Grise.

“If it’s not safe for us to continue we make sure that we refer them to a health care professional to deal with the situation,” she added.

Vermilion-Lloydminster MLA Richard Starke who spoke with Grise, said that he has all the confidence because of the training that pharmacists receive that they can prescribe medication, in some ways, as another professional.

“Pharmacists are a key profession in terms of providing access in all parts of the province,” he said.

“There is a skill set in our pharmacists that in the past has been untapped,” Starke said. “These are skilled professionals ... they can be a big part of the overall healthcare picture.”

Starke said that the expanded scope that the government has given the pharmacists in the province has given them the chance to do a lot more for people.

According to Grise, pharmacists continue their education even after leaving school.

“It’s always something that evolves, because the recommendations change, and you have to make sure that you are staying on top of it, and applying it to every situation.”

Starke is part way through a rural health review that was tasked to him by Minister of Health Stephen Mandel and part of the review is looking at the delivery of health care in all of Alberta.

“Particularly in smaller communities, pharmacists have been there for a long, long time. These are folks that know their clients, and know a lot of their medical conditions.”

Under the Healthcare Closer to Home, this is the first year that pharmacists are allowed to administer flu vaccines. According to Gise, this has taken the work load off doctors.

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News
Posted Dec 17, 2014

Increase in pharmacist powers improving health care

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Nova Scotia
Increase in pharmacist powers improving health care
More than 74,000 Nova Scotians were vaccinated at a pharmacy last year and it’s that kind of number that shows that the increased powers that pharmacists have received are working.

http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2014-12-07/article-3966623/Increase-in-pharmacist-powers-improving-health-care%3A-Neighbourhood-Pharmacy-Association/1

Lawtons, New Glasgow NS

Allan Austin, director of communications for the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, was in town earlier this week however to meet with Local MLA Pat Dunn and talk about some of those services in an effort to raise awareness of the potential.

Healthcare Closer to Home is an initiative to promote the delivery of professional healthcare from neighbourhood pharmacies. The program brings politicians into neighbourhood pharmacies to meet the pharmacist, experience a demonstration of an expanded scope of practice service, and to hear stories from the pharmacist about how these new services have been important to patients.

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association says the specialized training of pharmacists makes them a knowledgeable, regulated, and accessible resource that patients can use. Not only does this help improve access to healthcare, but it also provides cost-savings for the health system, and reduces the strain and pressure on our traditional healthcare providers in doctors’ offices and emergency rooms.

Provincial governments across Canada are increasing pharmacist scope of practice, enabling pharmacists to deliver services to their full potential. Healthcare Closer to Home showcases these services to the public, and encourage policy-makers to continue increasing pharmacist scope of practice where appropriate.

In 2010, the Nova Scotia government began passing a series of legislative and regulatory changes to expand the range of patient services pharmacists can provide.

Patients in Nova Scotia can now visit their neighbourhood pharmacy to seek treatment for certain minor ailments, such as cold sores and back pain.

Studies show that general practitioners spend around 15 per cent of their time treating patients with minor ailments, so by shifting these visits to the neighbourhood pharmacy, doctors have more time to focus on patients with more complex care needs.

Pharmacists also have the ability to renew, adapt, and substitute certain prescriptions.

To ensure a patient’s course of therapy can continue uninterrupted, pharmacists in Nova Scotia can renew most routine prescriptions without requiring the patient to present a new doctor’s prescription.

Pharmacists can also substitute for a different drug to reduce side effects, as well as alter the formulation of a prescription (ie. from a liquid to a capsule); change the regimen (ie. take four times a day instead of twice a day); or adjust the dose of the medication.

The expanded ability to renew, adapt and substitute prescriptions complements the medication review program, where pharmacists provide one-on-one counselling to patients to make sure they are taking their medications safely and appropriately.

Research has shown many severe illnesses – and deaths – are directly related to people receiving the wrong dosage of a drug, the wrong combination of drugs, or drugs which are not appropriate for them. Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) also put a strain on the health system with around 5 per cent of emergency room visits and 6 per cent of all hospitalizations as the result of ADRs. Many ADRs are preventable, and pharmacists can work with patients to ensure they are receiving appropriate, safe and effective treatments.

Pharmacists with proper training are also allowed to give vaccines such as the flu shot and other travel vaccines. Last flu season (2013/2014) was the first for pharmacists administering flu shots, and around 48 per cent of the province received vaccinations, up from the annual average of 34 to 35 per cent.

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Posted Dec 17, 2014

Health care Closer to Home in Kingston

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Lovell Drugs
Health care Closer to Home in Kingston
Brent Schneider has witnessed more changes to his role as pharmacist in the past five years than he has experienced in his entire 30-year-career

http://www.kingstonregion.com/news-story/5207575-health-care-closer-to-home/

Lovell Drugs, Kingston ON

By Hiba Kesebi

Brent Schneider has witnessed more changes to his role as pharmacist in the past five years than he has experienced in his entire 30-year-career. 

That’s because in 2012, the Ontario government passed regulations allowing for pharmacists to have a broader range of patient services that they can provide.

On Nov. 28, Schneider and his team of pharmacists met with MPP Sophie Kiwala to discuss these changes as part of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada’s Healthcare Closer to Home initiative, which highlights the expanding range of services that pharmacists can now provide.

“Because of these changes, we are providing easier access to care,” explained Schneider, pharmacy manager for the Medical Arts Pharmacy on Princess Street. “Health care is not a competition; healthcare is about having the services available for people in a timely fashion and we are able to help provide those services,” he added.

Under the bill, pharmacists can now renew prescriptions for up to six months or for the length of the original prescription, whichever is less. They can also alter the formulation of a prescription – for example, from a liquid to a capsule – change the regimen or the frequency, which medication should be administered, and adjust the dose of a medication, if necessary.

“Right now, if someone with asthma comes in to the pharmacy on a Friday night and they need another inhaler, their doctor is gone, they can’t get down to emergency but they are here, we actually have the scope to renew prescriptions,” explained Joel Donnelly, a pharmacist with the Medical Arts Pharmacy.

According to Donnelly, pharmacists cannot prescribe any medication – unless it’s for smoking cessation and is done through the Ontario Pharmacy Cessation Program, which provides smokers with the access, medication, expertise and ongoing counselling they need to quit.

“We have had really positive feedback from smoking cessation. We have a few patients, who every time they come to the pharmacy, tell me they are still not smoking,” Donnelly said, noting the effectiveness of the program.

In addition to having more autonomy over renewing and administrating medication, pharmacists can also provide wellness counselling, which allows them to demonstrate to patients the proper use of devices like glucose meters, inhalers, and epi-pens.

Pharmacist can also meet with patients, whether it is through home visits or in-pharmacy visits, to discuss their medication history and assess their medication profile.

“Many times patients like to come in before a planned hospital admission or elective surgery to reconcile the medications and have a current list of all the medications they currently take to provide their surgeon or physician,” said Jen Belcher, who is also a pharmacist with the Medical Arts Pharmacy.

Belcher noted the importance of wellness counselling as it ensures patients are properly taking care of themselves, which reduces the risk of needing specialized or emergency healthcare.

Thanks to the 2012 regulation, pharmacists can now also administer flu vaccinations.

In fact, over 2,500 pharmacies in Ontario have trained pharmacists who can administer the flu vaccine to patients who are five years old or older. Last year, pharmacists injected more than 650,000 people with the vaccine.

Having pharmacists administer the vaccine ultimately reduces the strain on the healthcare system and allows physicians the time to focus on more complicated cases, explained Schneider.

“Because we are dealing with healthy people who want to stay healthy, physicians can then have more time to deal with people who are sick and need to be diagnosed,” he added.

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Posted Dec 9, 2014

Costco Pharmacy sets the standard for high quality patient care

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Costco Pharmacy
 

Costco Pharmacy sets the standard for high quality patient care

The lowest prescription costs and high quality products offered by Costco Pharmacy are only the beginning of what makes it a convenient and friendly pharmacy experience. With 69 pharmacy locations across Canada, Costco Pharmacies reach almost the entire country, and prescription and clinic services are available to everyone, not just Costco members. Costco Pharmacies are more than a place to pick up prescriptions and ask health questions. They take pride in offering, at no cost, access to their innovative and ongoing health and wellness programs on a variety of topics, such as diabetes and heart health. Many of their clinics use the latest devices that allow their pharmacists to immediately and accurately determine test results, and then work with the patient and their doctor to develop a tailored healthcare plan. Their pharmacists also provide one-on-one consultations to discuss with the patient how their medications are working. The review includes over-the-counter medications, as well as answers to any other questions or health concerns. At the end of the service, patients are provided with an up-to-date list of all their medications. Pharmacists have recently been given a greater healthcare role. In certain provinces, Costco pharmacists order lab tests, adapt prescriptions to better suit the patients’ needs, and renew prescriptions. They can also administer injections and immunizations and prescribe for common minor ailments as permitted by provincial laws. In the case of specialty medications, their pharmacists can educate patients on how to administer the injections themselves and in some cases, inject the medication for the patient if they’re having trouble. In select provinces, Costco pharmacies offer a home delivery service by mail and the option to refill prescriptions online, 24 hours a day. Costco Pharmacy provides exceptional service and, more importantly, high-quality, personalized care.

 

Disclaimer: Pharmacies located in Costco Wholesale Quebec locations are independently owned and operated.

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Posted Dec 9, 2014

Healthcare Closer to Home National Post Supplement

News, National Post, Healthcare Closer to Home
Healthcare Closer to Home National Post Supplement
A special, freestanding 8-page supplement that highlights what neighbourhood pharmacies are doing with immunizations and other expanded scope of practice services to improve Canadians’ health and wellbeing, and to make accessing healthcare easier and clos
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News
Posted Dec 9, 2014

Expect one-on-one consultations with Calgary CO-OP pharmacists

Co-Op Pharmacy, Healthcare Closer to Home, National Post

Based solely in Alberta, Calgary Co-op Pharmacies have the capacity to offer patients one of the most robust ranges of pharmacy services in Canada. With 24 locations in Calgary and the surrounding area, the pharmacies usually have more than one pharmacist on duty at each location, allowing them to conduct one-on-one consultations with patients that wouldn’t be possible with only one pharmacist. Calgary Co-op Pharmacies also have three full-time and two part-time clinical pharmacists who work solely to offer professional services for patients on a consultation level. They each cover about eight stores and visit at least once every two weeks. This gives patients access to pharmacists who have extensive training in consultation services, such as diabetic education, respiratory education, injections, tobacco reduction, and additional prescribing authority. The clinical pharmacist service and the multiple pharmacists on staff give patients confidence that they can receive walk-in access to an educated healthcare professional. The Calgary Co-op Pharmacies also offer travel health services. With a travel division in Calgary Co-op stores, they receive many referrals giving customers a one-stop-shop for all of their travel health needs, instead of coordinating with a travel clinic or their physician. In addition to these services, Calgary Co-op Pharmacies offer peak pulmonary function testing labs, injections and vaccinations, a centralized compounding site, veterinary medicated products, medical centres that are also in the food centres and diabetic educators that can replace long waits for diabetic education centres. Calgary Co-op Pharmacies also have a list of the languages each pharmacist speaks, so patients can get the care they need in their preferred language. Calgary Co-op Pharmacies pride themselves on offering primary healthcare within the neighbourhood.

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News
Posted Dec 8, 2014

Where Can You Go For Healthcare That Meets Your Family’s Needs, Your Family’s Schedule?

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, National Post
Where Can You Go For Healthcare That Meets Your Family’s Needs, Your Family’s Schedule?
Medical Care You never know. Predicting when your kids will get a sore throat, a rash or a minor infection is next to impossible.

http://www.pharmacyinfo.ca/medical-care/where-can-you-go-for-healthcare-that-meets-your-familys-needs-your-familys-schedule

National Post Healthcare Closer to Home Supplement

By Post Media

If your parents need to know how their medications will interact with over the counter products, it can’t wait. It can be a matter of life and death.

There’s really no way to know when someone in your family is going to need quick access to professional healthcare.  And if that need arises at night, or on the weekend, or you live in a community without a hospital or easy access to a clinic, there’s a real risk the issue is going to get worse before it gets better.

Family doctor appointments, even on an urgent basis, can take days to get. Walk-in clinics typically only offer limited evening hours, usually with long wait times, and hospital emergency rooms are designed, staffed and equipped for treatment of the most seriously ill or injured patients on an acute care basis. So, where can you go for the other healthcare that meets your family’s needs and their schedule?

There’s no truly one-size-fits-all solution. But for many Canadian families, their neighbourhood pharmacy offers accessible healthcare advice that’s closer to where they live, work, and play. Canada has about 9,000 neighbourhood pharmacies across the country, many open 24 hours a day,  seven days a week,  and even more open to midnight, where a growing range of services is available, usually without an appointment.

"Canadians trust and respect their pharmacists, based largely on pharmacists’ expertise as medication specialists, but there is evidence that Canadians are increasingly comfortable having their pharmacists provide other professional healthcare services."

Many Canadians are now familiar with pharmacy flu shots, but there’s a growing list of patient services being delivered in neighbourhood pharmacies around the country that they may not know about.  These services include prescribing for minor ailments, wellness and preventative care, diabetes management, smoking cessation, administering other vaccines and support for chronic conditions.  Each province regulates its own pharmacies, so this lack of knowledge may be due to the varying services available.

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) conducted in-depth public opinion research and it indicates that Canadians have a positive view of their neighbourhood pharmacies. We see pharmacies as “friendly” (91 per cent agree or somewhat agree), and providing advice that is “accessible” (90 per cent), “supporting patient care through advice on medicines” (92 per cent), “sharing health information” (88 per cent) and “helping prevent illness through programs such as flu shots” (85 per cent).       

Canadians trust and respect their pharmacists, based largely on pharmacists’ expertise as medication specialists,  but there is evidence that Canadians are increasingly comfortable having their pharmacists provide other professional healthcare services. Research recently published by Shoppers Drug Mart associate-pharmacist John Papastergiou, in the “Canadian Pharmacists Journal” (Oct 28, 2014) addressed patient reactions from flu shot recipients in October–November 2013.  

Based on more than 1,500 survey responses, patients were overwhelmingly positive: 86 per cent reported they were very comfortable with the pharmacist administering the injection, and 92 per cent said that they were very satisfied with the pharmacist’s services and injection technique. Perhaps even more impressively, seven per cent of respondents indicated they had never received a flu shot before, 28 per cent would not have obtained one last year, had it not been available at a neighbourhood pharmacy, and 99 per cent would recommend that family and friends be vaccinated by a pharmacist.

Canadians have increasingly looked to their neighbourhood pharmacies to receive their flu shots in recent years. At Neighbourhood Pharmacies member locations, total flu shots administered have increased dramatically – from zero in 2008, to almost 1.4 million in the 2013 - 2014 flu season. To date, provincial regulations have enabled pharmacists in eight provinces to administer flu shots.

Recent behavioural research indicates that Canadians believe pharmacists, in addition to administering flu shots, could also provide wellness and preventative services, including writing, changing and refilling prescriptions, managing chronic conditions, assessing medications and treating minor ailments. Across the board, the research also clearly shows that the main driver behind Canadians’ interest in obtaining these services at pharmacies is convenience of access.  

Neighbourhood pharmacies are stepping up to take on a greater role in delivering healthcare, where and when Canadians need it.

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Posted Dec 8, 2014

The Flu — It’s Not Just A Bad Cold

Healthcare Closer to Home, National Post, News
The Flu — It’s Not Just A Bad Cold
Medical Care It’s time we see the flu for what it really is: a serious illness

http://www.pharmacyinfo.ca/medical-care/the-flu-its-not-just-a-bad-cold

National Post Healthcare Closer to Home Supplement

By Post Media

Although many people mistakenly use the terms “flu” and “cold” almost interchangeably, the flu is a much more severe health risk than the common cold.

Health Canada estimates between 2,000 and 8,000 Canadians die of the flu and its complications each year.

In the best case scenario, the typical flu will knock you off your feet for a week or two with a high fever, painful dry cough, or aches and chills. The discomfort alone, combined with time lost from work, school, or family responsibilities, makes the flu something to be taken very seriously.

“Those who worry the vaccine can make  you sick, it is made from an inactivated virus, so it simply cannot give you the flu.”

But for young children, seniors, pregnant women, and people with chronic illnesses, like diabetes or heart disease, influenza can escalate into even more severe health complications — such as pneumonia — and result in hospitalizations.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 100 children died in the United States last year as a result of the flu and complications. 90 per cent of those children were not vaccinated.

Annual vaccination is the single best way to prevent the flu and its consequences. Safe and effective vaccines have been used for over 60 years, and with neighbourhood pharmacies across Canada now providing flu shots, it is more convenient than ever to be immunized.

For those who worry the flu shot can make you sick, it is made from an inactivated virus, so it simply cannot give you the flu. For those afraid of needles, a nasal spray vaccine has got you covered.
And even if you consider yourself healthy and not at risk of getting sick, you can still be a transmitter of the virus. Influenza spreads easily, and can sweep through schools, nursing homes, businesses and communities. It takes as little as breathing in the same air where an infected person just coughed to become infected.

The flu is a serious illness and a real public health challenge. Protect yourself, help protect others, and get your flu shot this season.

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Posted Dec 8, 2014

Why Neighbourhood Pharmacy Matters To Canadians

Healthcare Closer to Home, National Post, News
Why Neighbourhood Pharmacy Matters To Canadians
The Future of Pharmacies Canadians enjoy the convenience and ease of access to about 9,000 neighbourhood pharmacies across the country. They are nearby, open convenient hours and offer a growing range of healthcare services.

http://www.pharmacyinfo.ca/the-future-of-pharmacies/why-neighbourhood-pharmacy-matters-to-canadians

National Post Healthcare Closer to Home Supplement

By Post Media

Canada’s neighbourhood pharmacies range from standalone ‘mom-and-pop’ shops to large-format stores, with an extensive range of healthcare products, services and general merchandise. What all these different examples of neighbourhood pharmacies have in common, however, is a dedication to delivering compassionate, professional healthcare – to the highest standards.

Over time, the role of neighbourhood pharmacies has expanded. Now, in addition to the core services of dispensing medications and consulting with patients on them, many pharmacies offer a wider range of healthcare services — the profession’s term is ‘expanded scope of practice’ — of which flu vaccinations may be the most familiar. The ‘expanded scope’ services available in pharmacies vary by province and location, but include adjusting prescription medications, assisting in the management of chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, assessing and prescribing for minor ailments and assistance with smoking cessation.

"Canadians expect their healthcare system to be there for them."

Accessing primary healthcare in a neighbourhood pharmacy offers Canadians healthcare closer to where we live, work and play. Many services are available without an appointment and many pharmacies are open 24 hours, with even more open to midnight. That means common ailments can often be assessed and treated with a one-time, one-place solution. When combined with the other goods and services on offer in many pharmacies, there’s an unmatched value proposition that serves Canadians well and respects the many demands on their daily lives.    

Canadians like and trust their neighbourhood pharmacies, and find them friendly, providing advice that is accessible, affordable and supportive of patient care through advice on medications, sharing health information and helping to prevent illness, through programs like flu shots. In fact, almost 80 per cent of us consult one at least annually on a healthcare concern or question.

Neighbourhood Pharmacies — the trade association behind the retail pharmacy business in Canada — is conducting research aimed at developing evidence-based solutions to provide support for continued expansion of pharmacy healthcare services. Canadians expect their healthcare system to be there for them. Their neighbourhood pharmacies are a vital part of a sustainable system that delivers accessible, affordable high quality healthcare services.

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Posted Dec 8, 2014

9000 Points Of Care

Healthcare Closer to Home, National Post, News
9000 Points Of Care
The Future of Pharmacies Acting now to sustain Canadians’ access to quality, affordable healthcare.

http://www.pharmacyinfo.ca/the-future-of-pharmacies/9000-points-of-care

National Post Healthcare Closer to Home Suplement

By Post Media

It’s not fresh news to us, but Canada’s universal healthcare system is under mounting pressure from the twin challenges of increasing costs and a rapidly aging population. Although the rate of cost increases has slowed in recent years, healthcare now accounts for more than 40 per cent of provincial government budgets.

Our healthcare system — which was built to deliver acute care in hospitals — is now faced with a population whose needs are evolving towards managing chronic conditions, like diabetes and high blood pressure, where hospital treatment is among the most costly options. What is already expensive is set to become even more costly, as our population ages and requires more care. In 2011 there were about five million Canadians 65 or older, a number expected to grow to about 10.4 million by 2036 — doubling both in total numbers and as a proportion of Canada’s overall population.

“Five creative initiatives have the potential to reduce governments’ healthcare costs by $8.5 billion to $11 billion over three years…”

Recognition of this looming challenge isn’t new, either, as various Royal Commissions, inquiries and studies stretching back a decade or more have all called for fundamental change in the way healthcare is delivered in Canada.

In 2013, the broader pharmacy community embarked on an ambitious research agenda. The result was a ground-breaking policy platform titled “9000 Points of Care: Improving Access to Affordable Healthcare.”

The absolute focus of “9000 Points of Care” was to protect healthcare for future generations. As such, concrete, actionable strategies that will improve patient care and health outcomes that makes better use of taxpayers’ scarce dollars were developed.

Together, “9000 Points of Care’s” five creative initiatives have the potential to reduce governments’ healthcare costs by $8.5 billion to $11 billion over three years. These findings were independently validated by the Conference Board of Canada.

Implementing these strategies will provide immediate healthcare benefits to patients and economic benefits to governments, insurers and individual Canadians alike. The strategies include:

  • Using neighbourhood pharmacies to treat common ailments such as diaper rash, cold sores, allergic rhinitis and oral thrush, and to administer vaccines, has the potential to free up to 2.4 million physician hours to focus on more complex cases and prevent up to 600,000 emergency room visits and 1,500 hospitalizations.
     
  • Helping Canadians afford the medicines they need through increased access to and use of affordable generic medications can reduce overall system costs by $7 billion to $9 billion.
     
  • Supporting patients with chronic conditions — managing chronic conditions more effectively, including increased use of neighbourhood pharmacy resources, could free up to 6.3 million hours of physician time, prevent up to 1.3 million ER visits and 500,000 hospitalizations.
     
  • Optimizing distribution of essential healthcare products, such as flu vaccines – by using the pharmacy industry’s distribution system (as in Alberta and Prince Edward Island) – will reduce inefficiencies resulting in waste and spoilage, and result in a state of the art emergency preparedness and pandemic response system.
     
  • Preventing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) – better electronic infrastructure, resources, connectivity and information-sharing will help avoid up to 300,000 ER visits and up to 86,000 hospitalizations due to ADRs. Although these strategies represent new and different ways of delivering healthcare, they all have the advantages of being practical and of being capable of being implemented in the short-to-medium term. Through these five strategies, we can deliver patient and economic benefits for all Canadians. Neighbourhood pharmacies are ready to help serve Canadians better.  
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News
Posted Dec 8, 2014

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Of Tomorrow

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, National Post
The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Of Tomorrow
The Future of Pharmacies Neighbourhood pharmacies are already an important part of the patient healthcare landscape.

http://www.pharmacyinfo.ca/the-future-of-pharmacies/the-neighbourhood-pharmacy-of-tomorrow

National Post Healthcare Closer to Home Supplement

By Media Post

Neighbourhood pharmacies are already an important part of the patient healthcare landscape. They deliver a growing range of primary healthcare medication and patient services — and they are set to play an even larger role as the country’s broader healthcare system evolves to address the needs of an aging population managing their chronic conditions.

The first way neighbourhood pharmacies can be expected to change will be through continued expansion of pharmacists’ scope of practice, enabling pharmacists to administer more vaccines, such as travel shots and the range of vaccines now more typically delivered through the public health service channels, such as HPV and meningitis, as well as other patient-focused services. Another way neighbourhood pharmacies will enhance their value to patients and the healthcare system alike will be through more standardization of services across the country — so patients can expect to access the same offering in all provinces and territories, instead of the current patchwork approach. There are also further healthcare system benefits to be achieved by using the pharmacy industry’s distribution system for delivering vaccines to pharmacies. This system already operates well, providing pharmacies with needed medical products, effectively maintaining product integrity, including cold chain protection, and delivering daily on a just-in-time basis.

“They are set to play an even larger role as the country’s broader healthcare system evolves to address the needs of an aging population managing their chronic conditions…” 

In pharmacies themselves, there’s another change under way, as they evolve from focusing on dispensing medications and educating and counselling patients on their use, to engaging with their patients on overall wellness and preventive measures that will lead to longer, happier, healthier lives.  Pharmacy slang for this evolution is ‘changing the focus, from pills to patients.’

As just one example, the University of British Columbia has inaugurated what is described as Canada’s first university-affiliated licensed, pharmacist-staffed care clinic. Patients can book hour-long appointments for in-person, telephone or even Skype consultations about prescription and over-the-counter medications, supplements and natural health products — and how to address side effects and complications. What makes this service different is that it doesn’t deal directly with medications at all. There are no drugs on the premises. Instead, its sole offering is advice (including reports to patients’ doctors) and its operations are geared to delivering that in a way that suits its patients — effectively complementing traditional dispensary functions in a way that will be increasingly important to Canadians dealing with chronic conditions.  

As in many other parts of our daily lives, technology can also be expected to play a growing role in tomorrow’s neighbourhood pharmacies. Many pharmacy chains now offer mobile apps that allow patients to view flyers and special offers, create shopping lists and manage their prescriptions online. There’s also exploding interest in mobile health and electronic medical record (EMR) apps.

Technology companies, Apple among them, are developing mobile apps to track basic health stats — like weight and blood pressure, fitness, lab test results, nutrition, sleep and medications. These apps are able to record and maintain notes on medical conditions, emergency contacts, allergies and more, all with the goal of creating and maintaining a sophisticated and secure medical record with significant information resources that could be made available to healthcare professionals — with the owner’s permission — when needed. And, as if all this weren’t enough, even more future technology will be ‘wearable,’ in the form of watches equipped with sensors that will actively monitor some of your body’s functions and report on your performance to your smartphone.

Whether you’re dealing with your neighbourhood pharmacist in person, in the pharmacy, on the phone, or over the internet, the neighbourhood pharmacist will remain your trusted, friendly healthcare advisor, whose primary focus will always be your health and wellbeing.

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Posted Dec 5, 2014

Pharmacists on the front lines of health care in Durham

Whitby, Ontario
Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Lovell Drugs
Pharmacists on the front lines of health care in Durham
The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada’s ‘Healthcare Closer to Home’ initiative promotes the need to increase pharmacist scope of practice across the province.

When Rita Winn started working as a pharmacist more than 30 years ago, her job consisted of “counting the pills, making sure that we got the prescription right, and following the orders from the doctor.”    

Much has changed since then, she says, as the role of pharmacies continues to evolve across the country. Whether it’s for flu shots, prescription renewals, smoking cessation programs or wellness counselling, people are dropping by to see their local pharmacist for many more reasons these days.    

“We’ve been in the community for over 100 years and we feel really strongly about the relationship the patient has with the pharmacist,” said Ms. Winn, chief operating officer at Lovell Drugs.    

“Our store is open seven days a week, and it’s easy if you’re not feeling well, instead of going to a clinic or going to (the emergency room), people come in or call and ask all kinds of questions.”    

In 2012, the Ontario government passed regulations allowing pharmacists to use their education and training to provide a broader range of patient services.    

Pharmacists can now renew prescriptions for up to six months or for the length of the original prescription -- whichever is less. They can alter the formulation of a prescription (for example, from a liquid to a capsule); change the regimen (take four times a day instead of twice a day); or adjust the dose of the medication. Pharmacists in Ontario can prescribe medications to help patients quit smoking and through wellness counselling, they can demonstrate to patients the proper use of devices such as glucose meters, inhalers, and epi-pens.    

At the Whitby branch of Lovell Drugs recently, Ms. Winn spoke about the benefits of these additional services, including increased convenience for patients and a more efficient and cost-effective use of health care resources.         

“The health care system is stressed; there are a lot of people waiting, you can’t always get into the physician’s office when you need, and there are a lot of complicated cases,” she said.    

“We can help physicians by taking the load off so that they can focus their time on people that really need their help and we can handle some of the easier, less complicated things, such as flu shots.”    

More than 2,500 pharmacies in Ontario now have trained pharmacists who can administer the flu vaccine to patients aged five and older. In 2013, pharmacists in Ontario injected more than 650,000 people with the vaccine -- a huge jump from 250,000 the previous year.     

Whitby-Oshawa MPP Christine Elliott was invited to the Whitby pharmacy on Nov. 21 to receive her flu shot and learn more about the expanded services available to patients. Her visit was part of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association’s “Healthcare Closer to Home” initiative, which involves enlisting the help of politicians to promote the delivery of professional health care at neighbourhood pharmacies.    

“We still have a shortage of family physicians so for people to be able to have routine things done in the community I think is really important,” said Ms. Elliott, who also serves as health critic for the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.    

“Flu shots are just sort of the opening but there are so many other things that can be done, especially as people are struggling with diabetes, hypertension, arthritis, and other chronic conditions. I think pharmacists are in a unique position to be able to provide those kinds of services.”    

In addition to showcasing patient benefits of the expanded scope of practice across Ontario, the Healthcare Closer to Home program also underscores areas where there is room for further expansion.    

Additional services pharmacists could provide include prescribing for minor ailments, such as cold sores and back pain, according to the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada. Studies show that general practitioners spend around 15 per cent of their time treating patients with minor ailments so sending these patients to the pharmacy instead can help focus their attention on patients with more complex care needs.    

Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Nova Scotia currently allow pharmacists to prescribe for minor ailments and New Brunswick has passed legislation that is in the process of being implemented.    

“Other provinces are more the forerunners of this whole concept of getting pharmacists most involved, especially on the front line and taking some of the stress off the doctors,” said Hady Shu, a pharmacist at Lovell Drugs in Whitby.    

 “We’re not the pill counters ... I definitely feel that it’s very important that we are recognized as part of the health care team.”

News
Posted Dec 3, 2014

Ontario pharmacists seek expanded scope of practice

Stoney Creek, ON
Healthcare Closer to Home, Stoney Creek, News, Ontario
Ontario pharmacists seek expanded scope of practice
It’s Friday night and a mother needs help with her infant son who won’t stop crying. Her family doctor is out of the office until Monday. A visit to the local emergency room could result in a wait of several hours. In some provinces, a pharmacist could di

http://www.hamiltonnews.com/news/ontario-pharmacists-seek-expanded-scope-of-practice/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ontario-pharmacists-seek-expanded-scope-of-practice&article_id=19628315015

 

Queenstown Pharmacy, Stoney Creek, ON

Hamilton Community News, Stoney Creek ON

By Mike Pearson

It’s the kind of story Allan Austin has heard many times.

It’s Friday night and a mother needs help with her infant son who won’t stop crying. Her family doctor is out of the office until Monday. A visit to the local emergency room could result in a wait of several hours.

Austin, director of communications for the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (NPAC), said in some provinces, a pharmacist could directly prescribe medication for a minor ailment, such as diaper rash. So far, Ontario hasn’t joined that list of provinces, which currently includes Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Nova Scotia.

An NPAC report says expanding pharmacists’ scope of practice to include treating minor ailments and administering vaccines could prevent up to 600,000 ER visits; 1,500 hospitalizations and free up 2.4 million physician hours to focus on more critical care.

“It’s about enabling neighbourhood pharmacists like this one to do things like diabetes education,” said Austin. “If pharmacists had expanded scope of practice to do things like prescribing for minor ailments, you then get the mom and the baby taken care of at one time, one place.”

Ashraf Zaki, pharmacist manager inside the busy Queenston Medical and Dental Centre, said increasing a pharmacy’s range of services can help relieve pressure on the overall health care system.

“I consider pharmacists the most accessible health care providers,” he said.

An appointment with a family doctor can involve a lengthy wait time, especially if patients don’t have an appointment, Zaki said. Nurses often have the same medical expertise as doctors, but aren’t easily accessible.

Zaki said Queenston Pharmacy welcomes an expanded scope of practice. The pharmacy already provides blood glucose testing for diabetes patients. Like other pharmacies throughout Ontario, Queenston Pharmacy can administer flu vaccines, but typically refers patients to one of the family doctors located within the same building.

Kathryn Clarke, spokesperson for the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, said the college does in general support scope of practice expansions for other regulated health professionals – as long as those expansions meet certain standards.

Clarke said the changes must be consistent with the knowledge, skill and judgment of the professionals involved and those professionals must be subject to a rigorous regulatory structure. The expansion of scope must involve a collaborative approach to care, include educational initiatives for both the public and health care providers so that everyone understands the changes being made. And any changes must be safe for patients.

“The CPSO is of the view that stringent educational requirements must be put in place by regulatory colleges to ensure that all health professionals have the necessary knowledge, skill and judgment to effectively and safely prescribe the drugs designated in their respective regulations,” Clarke said.

But Dr. Ved Tandan, Ontario Medical Association president, stressed it’s important that patients are served by the most appropriate health professional.

“Ontario’s Doctors believe every health care professional has a role to play in providing the best quality of care to everyone in Ontario and that success comes from working in collaboration. Ontario’s doctors value pharmacists as key partners in providing excellent care to patients.  That being said, it is important to ensure that any health professional providing any service is deemed the most appropriate to ensure Ontario’s patients are receiving the best care.  In Ontario, a wide variety of medications for ‘minor ailments’ are already available over-the-counter and the OMA believes this strikes a good balance between access and safety,” Tandan states in an email.

Hamilton East-Stoney Creek NDP MPP Paul Miller said expanding a pharmacy’s range of services can alleviate the pressure on ERs and help patients deal with minor health concerns, instead of sitting in a doctors office for hours on end.

“I am in support of expanding the scope of practice at pharmacies,” said Miller. “I think it is going to take some pressure off the (health care) system. Certainly it can free up beds. It can help emergency rooms deal with more serious situations. People won’t go in to the hospital with a cut, they’ll go to the pharmacy.”

Miller said the NPAC could work in conjunction with the Ontario Medical Association to determine how pharmacies can offer expanded services. Miller said health care and education combined represent close to 70 per cent of provincial government expenditures and any effort to reduce those costs are welcomed.

Along with the ability to treat minor ailments and administer vaccines, the NPAC’s plan to improve access to affordable health care includes ensuring affordable access to key medications, providing the ability to manage chronic conditions, leveraging the pharmaceutical distribution model and preventing adverse drug reactions.

The NPAC report was independently validated by the Conference Board of Canada

1 Attachments
News
Posted Dec 3, 2014

Pharmacists’ role in health care expands

Huntsville, ON
Huntsville, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario
Pharmacists’ role in health care expands
Pharmacist Bill Coon’s workdays have gotten busier. Coon, who is the co-owner of Muskoka Medical Remedy’s Rx in Huntsville, is one of thousands of pharmacists across the country that have been granted an expanded scope of practice, which allows them to pr

http://www.muskokaregion.com/news-story/5148310-pharmacists-role-in-health-care-expands/

Medical Remedy’s Rx , Huntsville ON

Muskokaregion.com, Muskoka ON

By Alison Brownlee

Pharmacist Bill Coon’s workdays have gotten busier.

Coon, who is the co-owner of Muskoka Medical Remedy’s Rx in Huntsville, is one of thousands of pharmacists across the country that have been granted an expanded scope of practice, which allows them to provide more services to patients.

“The days are crazy-busy, but perhaps the most satisfying of my career,” he said. “You’re making a difference.”

The pharmacy was the site of a media event hosted by the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada on Nov. 12. The aim was to promote the additional services pharmacists are now able to provide following policy changes at the provincial government level.

Pharmacists can now offer medication counselling, prescription renewals or adaptations, flu shots and vaccinations, minor diagnoses and prescriptions for smoking cessation, and wellness counselling, including health-device demonstrations and smoking cessation information.

Coon said pharmacists are compensated for some of the additional services, but they also require additional training before offering them.

“(Pharmacist) Barb (Coon) and I spent a weekend at a course to become injection certified, plus we have to keep our CPR and first aid up to date,” he said in reference to now providing flu shots.

And he said there is a lot of collaboration with physicians, too.

Parry Sound-Muskoka MPP Norm Miller attended the event.

Coon completed a mock MedsCheck, or medication and wellness consultation, with Miller that included a demonstration of a blood glucose meter. A pharmacist can now use a blood glucose meter to screen a patient for diabetes.

Miller said he supported expanded scope of practice for pharmacists because it is not only more efficient for the patient, but less costly for the health-care system.

The Ontario Pharmacists’ Association stated that shifting services to pharmacists would save the health-care system $143 million over five years.

“Health is the biggest item of the province’s budget,” said Miller. “It’s almost 50 per cent of a $130-billion budget.”

He said primary health care is an important topic in Muskoka and the additional services offered by pharmacists, along with the newly announced funding for community health hubs in Dorset and Port Carling as well as a mobile community health hub in Muskoka, would enhance access to it.

“I think, as long as there are safeguards put in place so there aren’t any risks at all, that it will make sense from both the dollars and cents perspective as well as a consumer perspective,” he said.

Allan Austin, director of communications for Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, said advocacy for additional expansions of pharmacists’ services is ongoing.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Dec 3, 2014

Miller supports expanded role for pharmacists

Huntsville, ON
Healthcare Closer to Home, Huntsville, News, Ontario
If politicians like Parry Sound-Muskoka MPP Norm Miller get on board, a new proposal to continue to expand the scope of practice for pharmacists could be successful.

eedition.whatsupmuskoka.com/doc/Whats-Up-Muskoka/wum-nov19-virtual_edition/2014111801/%20target=#2

Medical Remedy's Rx, Huntsville ON

Whats Up Muskoka, Muskoka ON

By Chirs Occhiuzzi

1 Attachments
News
Posted Dec 2, 2014

Cooper's Pharmacy Hosts MLA

Port Coquitlam, BC
Healthcare Closer to Home, BC, News, Port Coquitlam
Cooper's Pharmacy Hosts MLA
The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada hosted MLA Mike Farnworth for a meet and greet with Pharmacist Denice Bucsit at Cooper’s Foods Pharmacy in Port Coquitlam.

http://www.snapcoquitlam.com/index.php?option=com_sngevents&id[]=743463

Cooper's Pharmacy, Port Coquitlam BC 

Snap Newspaper Group, Port Coquitlam, BC 

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada hosted MLA Mike Farnworth for a meet and greet with Pharmacist Denice Bucsit at Cooper’s Foods Pharmacy in Port Coquitlam. It was a great event showcasing the amazing scope of practice of today’s Pharmacist. This extended scope of practice enables today’s Pharmacy to more effectively serve their neighbourhood clientele.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Nov 14, 2014

Pharmacies are getting more power to provide quality healthcare

Huntsville, ON
HCCH, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Huntsville
Pharmacies are getting more power to provide quality healthcare
The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada has launched the Healthcare Closer to Home initiative. The organization says it’s a step towards leveraging the accessibility of pharmacists to deliver minor treatments and counselling patients need in thei

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada has launched their Healthcare Closer to Home national initiative. Communications Director Allen Austin says it’s about highlighting for Canadians and policy makers the services that are available to local pharmacies.

Austin says pharmacies will help patients get treated quicker and closer to home. It will also lower costs for the overall healthcare system. Something Parry Sound-Muskoka MPP Norm Miller supports. Miller says giving pharmacists more opportunities could save the province money.

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada launched the Healthcare Closer to Home initiative. The organization says it’s the first step to leveraging the accessibility of pharmacists to deliver minor treatments and counselling patients need in their communities.

Bill Coon is the owner and pharmacist at Muskoka Medial Pharmacy in Huntsville. He says he’s excited about where the profession is going. He says pharmacists are the caretakers of a patient’s prescription profile.

Along with being able to provide the flu vaccine, pharmacists can now offer meds checks and extend current prescriptions. Coon says it’s important to develop relationships with your pharmacist because there is so much they can do to help you with lifestyle and medication choices.  For more information on the services pharmacies can now provide you can visit the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada’s website.

 

1 Attachments
News
Posted Nov 14, 2014

Miller gets look at new medical services pharmacists can offer

Huntsville, ON
HCCH, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Huntsville
New medical services by pharmacists were on display Wednesday when MPP Norm Miller toured a pharmacy in Huntsville
1 Attachments
News
Posted Nov 14, 2014

Do you know what your pharmacist can do? National campaign stops in Peterborough to educate residents.

Peterborough, ON
Healthcare Closer to Home, HCCH, News, Ontario, Peterborough
Do you know what your pharmacist can do? National campaign stops in Peterborough to educate residents.
Peterborough pharmacist happy with changes to his scope of practice but says he can do more.

PETEROROUGH -- Murad Younis knows he's got the knowledge and experience behind him to take minor tasks and responsibilities off physicians' shoulders -- as long as the government lets him.

During a visit from Peterorough MPP Jeff Leal and the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada on Wednesday (Nov. 12) the chief pharmacist at Westmount Pharmacy explained he's happy about how his role has expanded in recent years -- but says he can do more.

In an effort to expand the scope of pharmacists across Canada, the Ontario government started implementing new rules around pharmacists' work in 2010. In Ontario, it's allowed pharmacists to give immunizations and injections, adapt and alter medications on prescriptions to suit clients' needs and renew prescriptions for medications so patients who are in need don't go without while they try to get an appointment with their family doctor.

Mr. Younis says the changes are for the better, especially changes to rules that allow him and other pharmacists to have follow-up communication with clients, since he can develop a better relationships.

He views pharmacists as gate keepers -- they can recommend medications, consult with patients and have the authority to hand over medication for chronic illness and for routine medication when a patient runs out.

Still, he says he would welcome additional authority, to diagnose minor ailments, for example. He says it would alleviate pressure on physicians and would make care more accessible in neighbourhoods.

"It's not appropriate (for pharmacists) to have all the skills, the experience and the competencies… and you ask the family physician to do the job all by themselves."

MP Leal says pharmacies act as community hubs, and its important residents know about how their local pharmacies can help them.

The best way to determine whether an order for a medication can be renewed, or whether a pharmacist can provide medication without a prescription, is to ask, says Allan Austin, director of communication for the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada.

Currently the rules governing a pharmacists authority are different, depending on the province or territory. Mr. Austin says the association is working to change that.

"We would like more services and we would like them to be more uniform across the country," he says.

For more information visit www.neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Nov 14, 2014

Healthwatch: The expanding role of the pharmacist

Peterborough, ON
HCCH, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Peterborough
Healthwatch: The expanding role of the pharmacist
An event was held at Westmount Pharmacy to showcase the wide range of expertise offered by pharmacists

They’re on the frontlines of health care.The pharmacist. It’s a role that continues to evolve. From offering counselling to vaccines like the flu shot. An event was held today at Westmount Pharmacy to showcase the wide range of expertise offered by pharmacists. Mark Giunta has more on this week’s Healthwatch.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Nov 14, 2014

National effort aims to promote healthcare from pharmacies

Peterborough, ON
HCCH, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario, Peterborough
National effort aims to promote healthcare from pharmacies
MPP Jeff Leal gets acquainted with Westmount Pharmacy owner Murad Younis, and Allan Austin of Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada during the Healthcare Closer To Home event at Westmount Pharmacy in Peterborough.

The Healthcare Closer To Home event was held at Westmount Pharmacy in Peterborough on Wednesday.

The national initiative aims to promote the delivery of professional healthcare from neighbourhood pharmacies across Canada.

MPP Jeff Leal had the opportunity to meet pharmacy owner Murad Younis, experience a demonstration of an expanded scope of practice service and to hear real life stories from pharmacists about how the new services have been important to patients.

Services include, medication counselling, flu shots and vaccinations, minor diagnosis and prescribing and wellness counseling.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Nov 14, 2014

Peterborough pharmacist backs push for increased scope of practice

Peterborough, ON
Peterborough, HCCH, Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Ontario
Peterborough pharmacist backs push for increased scope of practice
A national pharmacy advocacy group says the countries pharmacists aren't being used to their potential. Representatives from the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada were at Westmount Pharmacy in Peterborough yesterday, talking about their Healthc

PETERBOROUGH PHARMACIST BACKS PUSH FOR INCREASED SCOPE OF PRACTICE
11/12/2014 4:33:01 PM
 A national pharmacy advocacy group says the countries pharmacists aren't being used to their potential.
Representatives from the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada were at Westmount Pharmacy in Peterborough yesterday, talking about their Healthcare Closer To Home inititiatve, which aims to expand the scope of practice at the country's pharmacies.
N-PAC's Alan Austin says Pharmacists across the country, including those at Westmount, could be doing so much more for patients, than their currently allowed. 
 

Westmount Pharmacy's Murad Younis tells Extra 90.5 , with the current healthcare system as complex as it is, it doesn't make sense for qualifed pharmacists to be limited from providing some key services.

 He adds, the increased scope would pay immediate dividends in the community, since pharmacists are so easily accessible and qualified for many services they can't currently provide.

 N-PAC says expanding the scope of practice to include all of their recommendations, would essentially add over 9-thousand new health care centres across the country.

1 Attachments
News
Posted Oct 30, 2014

Neighbourhood Pharmacies Poised to Deliver Sustainable Healthcare Closer to Home in Atlantic Canada

CHARLOTTETOWN
HCCH, Healthcare Closer to Home, Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, News, Public Affairs, Atlantic Canada, Sustainable Healthcare
Neighbourhood pharmacies are well positioned to contribute more to Canada’s healthcare system, using their reach, convenience and capabilities, according to Vivek Sood, Chair of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies).

Neighbourhood Pharmacies Poised to Deliver Sustainable Healthcare Closer to Home in Atlantic Canada

 

CHARLOTTETOWN, October 30, 2014 – Neighbourhood pharmacies are well positioned to contribute more to Canada’s healthcare system, using their reach, convenience and capabilities, according to Vivek Sood, Chair of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies). Sood delivered a keynote address titled Delivering Sustainable Healthcare Closer to Home at the Public Policy Forum’s Atlantic Summit on Healthcare and Drug Cost Sustainability. The Summit is co-hosted by the governments of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and New Brunswick.

 

“Neighbourhood Pharmacies wants to work collaboratively with governments in Atlantic Canada to make better use of our broad reach and unique capabilities to deliver quality, more convenient patient care and to make our healthcare system more sustainable,” said Sood, who is also General Manager of Lawton’s Drug Stores Ltd. “Some early opportunities to leverage pharmacies’ reach into neighbourhoods across Atlantic Canada include allowing the treatment of common ailments and the administration of vaccines, in addition to the flu shot, which is already delivered in pharmacies across Canada.”

 

Sood highlighted Neighbourhood Pharmacies’ recently released behavioral research, which indicates that Canadians are most familiar with pharmacists filling prescriptions and consulting on over-the-counter medications, and that their credibility is based on their expertise in medications.  The research shows that while Canadians are increasingly aware that pharmacists deliver additional services, there is varying understanding of the range of services that can be obtained in neighbourhood pharmacies.

 

“What we have learned through our research is that Canadians value pharmacy and its contributions to their health and wellness and they want more services provided in these convenient centres,” added Sood. “The clear implication for pharmacies and governments is that continued expansion of services provided in the pharmacy setting must be conducted incrementally and with care to ensure the high degree of trust Canadians have with their pharmacists can be maintained.”

 

Sood also outlined the Association and broader pharmacy industry’s policy platform: 9000 Points of Care: Improving Access to Affordable Healthcare.  He presented the Association’s research agenda, which is designed to demonstrate the patient health outcomes and systemic benefits to Canada’s healthcare system by delivering more healthcare services in the pharmacy setting.

 

About the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

 

The Neighborhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighborhood Pharmacies) is a strong voice and the leading advocate for the business of pharmacy in Canada. Our research and analytics deliver strategic insights about neighborhood pharmacy, patients, governments and payers to inform our policy development process. We aim to develop evidence-based business and public policy proposals that deliver tangible health and economic outcomes.

- 30 -

For further information please contact:

 

Allan McN. Austin

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

416 226 9100 ext 222

647 465 7596

www.neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

 

 

News
Posted Oct 27, 2014

Neighbourhood Pharmacies Announces New Board Chair; Thanks Outgoing Chair for Visionary Leadership

TORONTO
Announcement, Membership, News, News Release
Neighbourhood Pharmacies Announces New Board Chair; Thanks Outgoing Chair for Visionary Leadership
The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) announced today that Frank Scorpiniti, Chief Executive Officer of Rexall, will resign as Board Chair of the Association effective October 28, 2014. He will be succeeded by Vivek S

 

 Neighbourhood Pharmacies Announces New Board Chair; Thanks Outgoing Chair for Visionary Leadership

 

TORONTO, October 27, 2014 – The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) announced today that Frank Scorpiniti, Chief Executive Officer of Rexall, will resign as Board Chair of the Association effective October 28, 2014. He will be succeeded by Vivek Sood, General Manager of Lawton’s Drug Stores Limited, who has served as Vice Chair of the Association’s Board.

 

“On behalf of the staff at Neighbourhood Pharmacies, we want to thank Frank for his leadership as Chair during this dynamic time in our industry and congratulate him on his new role leading a retail organization in the United States. Frank Scorpiniti has been a visionary leader through a critical period in the Canadian retail pharmacy industry’s development,” said Denise Carpenter, President and Chief Executive Officer of Neighbourhood Pharmacies. “Through his vision and steadfast focus on putting patients first, Frank Scorpiniti helped position retail pharmacy as one part of the larger solution to the serious challenges facing the Canadian healthcare delivery system. Frank’s vision and focus are embodied in our industry’s seminal policy platform, 9000 Points of Care: Improving Access to Affordable Healthcare, and brought to life daily by our members at more than 6,500 locations across the country. We thank him and wish him well in all his future endeavors.”

 

“I want to thank Denise Carpenter and her dedicated staff at Neighbourhood Pharmacies for their unwavering support for our member companies. Neighbourhood Pharmacies’ laser focus on a renewed strategy has served to better align our members and the broader industry as a whole, all focused on improving healthcare delivery in Canada. With Neighbourhood Pharmacies’ support, I’m enthusiastic for the increasingly important healthcare role that pharmacy will play in Canada’s future,” said Frank Scorpiniti, Chief Executive Officer, Rexall.

 

Vivek Sood, who has served as Vice Chair, assumes the duties of Chair effective October 28, 2014. His first formal engagement as Chair will be to present a keynote address, “Neighbourhood Pharmacies – Delivering Sustainable Healthcare Closer to Home,” at the Public Policy Forum’s Atlantic Summit on Healthcare and Drug Cost Sustainability, Thursday, October 30, 2014, in Charlottetown.

 

“Vivek Sood and Frank Scorpiniti oversaw our Association’s recent rebranding and research-based policy agenda – which more directly link our work with where our members have their biggest impact on the health and wellbeing of Canadians – and they have been central in attracting other industry senior executives to help guide our Association and build its effectiveness. Our Association and industry are well positioned for the future with this seamless transition of leadership,” concluded Carpenter.

 

The Neighborhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighborhood Pharmacies) is a strong voice and the leading advocate for the business of pharmacy in Canada. Our research and analytics deliver strategic insights about neighborhood pharmacy, patients, governments and payers to inform our policy development process. We aim to develop evidence-based business and public policy proposals that deliver tangible health and economic outcomes.

- 30 -

For further information please contact:

 

Allan McN. Austin

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

416 226 9100 ext 222

647 465 7596

www.neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

 

 

 

 

 

1 Attachments
News
Posted Oct 16, 2014

Neighbourhood Pharmacies Increasinly Important to Canadian Patients and Consumers, According to New Research

Toronto
News Release, Data analytics, Research Series, Research
New research presented by the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) today at the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy 2014 “Pharmacy Forum,” demonstrates that Canadian patients and consumers believe their neighbourhood pharma

Neighbourhood Pharmacies Increasinly Important to Canadian Patients and Consumers, According to New Research 

TORONTO, October 15 2014 – New research presented by the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacies) today at the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy 2014 “Pharmacy Forum,” demonstrates that Canadian patients and consumers believe their neighbourhood pharmacies could play a greater role in providing convenient, effective, hands-on healthcare services. This expectation is founded on Canadian patients’ and consumers’ trust in their neighbourhood pharmacists and recognition of their specialized knowledge of medications.

 

“Canadians have a strong expectation that their neighbourhood pharmacies are becoming more important in routinely accessing primary healthcare,” said Denise Carpenter, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, who presented the Association’s research, “That expectation is driven by the belief that neighbourhood pharmacies provide enhanced convenience for patients and consumers alike.

 

“In addition to their established capabilities in dispensing medications, counselling on over-the-counter products and assessing the interactions of various types of medications, Canadians are increasingly looking to their neighbourhood pharmacies for additional, hands-on healthcare services, of which influenza vaccinations are among the most widely offered and recognized,” said Carpenter.

 

Currently, each province in Canada has its own regulations allowing pharmacists to perform hands-on healthcare services. As such, the research showed that, patients and consumers displayed varying degrees of knowledge about the specific healthcare services available in their neighbourhood pharmacies. Vaccine administrations were mentioned most frequently by research subjects, followed by wellness and preventative services, and writing/changing prescriptions, mentioned by 25 per cent of respondents.

 

“The bottom line message for neighbourhood pharmacies is to add new hands-on patient care services incrementally and thoughtfully, and to ensure that Canadians’ experience with new services fully reflects the high standards of care and compassion they have come to expect.” Added Carpenter, “Neighbourhood Pharmacies’ research suggests that the key to managing Canadians’ expectations will be emphasizing pharmacists’ credentials as healthcare providers, and creating the time and space needed to deliver these important health services in the pharmacy setting.”

 

Neighbourhood Pharmacies conducted three types of research in 2014, including broad public opinion research, baseline behavioural research, and targeted hypertension research with pharmacists and patients.

 

About the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighborhood Pharmacies) is a strong voice and the leading advocate for the business of pharmacy in Canada. Our research and analytics deliver strategic insights about neighborhood pharmacy, patients, governments and payers to inform our policy development process. We aim to develop evidence-based business and public policy proposals that deliver tangible health and economic outcomes.

 

Members can download the full research report and data sets by accessing the Neighbourhood Pharmacies Members-Only Site here: www.myneighbourhoodpharmacy.ca

 

-30-

 

 

For further information please contact:

Allan McN. Austin

Director, Communications

416 226 9100 ext 222

647 465 7596

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

 

 

 

 


October 15, 2014

 

Neighbourhood Pharmacies – Research

Getting to know what Patients and Consumers think of Neighborhood Pharmacies

 

Key Research Analysis

  • Patients and consumers value the pharmacist’s role in the broader healthcare system.
  • Their trust in the pharmacist is derived from their specialized knowledge of medications.
  • Both patients and consumers are looking for more convenience in receiving broader healthcare services and see pharmacies as a possible venue.
  • However, their lack of understanding of how addition services can be delivered in a pharmacy environment is a risk if governments and pharmacies roll out services too fast without educating Canadians.

Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

The Neighborhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighborhood Pharmacies) is the leading advocate for the business of pharmacy in Canada. Our research and analytics deliver strategic insights about neighborhood pharmacy, patients, governments and payers to inform our policy development process. We aim to develop evidence-based business and public policy proposals that deliver tangible health and economic outcomes.

In this edition we look at Canadian patients and consumers understanding and perceptions of Neighborhood Pharmacy. We focused in on patients with one or more chronic diseases and women with dependents and/or some responsibility for healthcare of aging family members.

Research Findings:

  • Patients and consumers saw the role of the pharmacist as filling prescriptions and over-the-counter consultation, as well as providing other services, such as assessing prescribed medications for potential interactions and administering vaccines.
  • When comparing the roles of pharmacists and physicians, most believed that pharmacists have more specialized knowledge about medications.
  • They were interested in expanded the healthcare services provided in pharmacies, for a number of reasons, including improving convenience and efficiency of the healthcare system among other reasons.
  • Patients and Consumers mentioned a number of potential barriers to growing the number of healthcare services provided in pharmacies including concerns about the qualifications of pharmacists and creating the time/space to deliver these new services.

Bottom Line

  • Neighborhood pharmacy must incrementally build on its credibility with patients and consumers if they wish to deliver additional services beyond dispending and advising on medicines.
    • This includes marketing these individual initiatives with specific mention of their credentials and the steps that have been taken to ensure the pharmacy environment has been adapted to deliver each unique service.

 

 

For further information please contact:

Allan McN. Austin

Director, Communications

416 226 9100 ext 222

647 465 7596

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

 

Research Methodology

The information summarized and analyzed in this report is derived from researched commissioned by Neighborhood Pharmacy to Decision Partners (DP). DP is an international team providing evidence-based, science-informed processes, methods and tools for understanding and influencing judgment, decision making and behaviour. DP conducted confidential one-on-one interviews with a total of 48 patients and consumers.

 

1 Attachments
News
Posted Sep 22, 2014

CACDS is now Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

Announcement, Feature Story, Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, News, Operations updates, Website
CACDS is now Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada
The association representing the majority of Canada’s pharmacy chains and banners has a new name, a new website, and a renewed focus on informing Canadians that community pharmacies are increasingly important providers of a broad range of healthcare servi

CACDS is now Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

Written by Vicki Wood on September 18, 2014 for CanadianHealthcareNetwork.ca

The association representing the majority of Canada’s pharmacy chains and banners has a new name, a new website, and a renewed focus on informing Canadians that community pharmacies are increasingly important providers of a broad range of healthcare services.

The Canadian Association of Chain Drug Stores is now the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada. At the September 17 unveiling of the new name and mission, the association’s board chair, Frank Scorpiniti (CEO of Rexall), described the new name as representative of the group’s mission to advance the awareness of Canada’s community or neighbourhood pharmacies as an increasingly important and effective destination for a growing range of primary healthcare services.

A publicity campaign to convey that message, called Healthcare Closer to Home, was launched earlier this summer and will continue to disseminate the story of pharmacists as an accessible, effective, but under-utilized healthcare resource available to all Canadians close to where they live.

Focus on 900 Points of Care Meanwhile the N.P.A.C. will continue work on its five-year strategic plan, which commenced this year. President and CEO Denise Carpenter noted that work will continue to show governments and others in the healthcare community that the strategies set out in the 2013 document, 9000 Points of Care, provide solid and effective steps for increasing the viability, affordability and effectiveness of the country’s healthcare system.

9000 Points of Care is a strategy document created by the association in partnership with the Canadian Generic Pharmaceutical Association. In the manifesto, the groups propose five strategies they insist could improve healthcare in Canada and save the healthcare system millions of dollars that could be put to work in other needed areas. These include the utilization of community pharmacy for extended healthcare services such as prescription adaption and minor ailment consulting, the increased use of lower-cost generic drugs, an enhanced electronic health information system and better support for the care and management of those with chronic conditions.(Learn more about 9000 Points of Care here.)

The association’s new name and branding efforts come just two months after the association’s largest member groups, Shoppers Drug Mart and Loblaw (which acquired Shoppers earlier this year), announced that they would withdraw their membership as of 2015. In late June of 2014, both corporations publicly stated that they had decided that they could better support expanded scope of service for pharmacists by supporting the Canadian Pharmacists Association. Both are also members of the Retail Council of Canada. Together, Shoppers Drug Mart and Loblaw operate about 1,800 pharmacies, which accounts for about 19% of the country’s community pharmacies.

As of 2015, N.P.A.C. represents 17 pharmacy chains, banners and franchisors, which operate approximately 6,500 pharmacies across Canada. Retail pharmacy companies comprise the membership base; pharmaceutical manufacturers, and makers of other healthcare and consumer goods products are represented as associate members.

The N.P.A.C has also launched a new website.

Change of strategy for CPhA This has been a summer of re-focusing for the country’s leading pharmacy groups. The Canadian Pharmacists Association, which represents the professional and practice aspects of pharmacy in this country, announced at its annual general meeting this past June that work had been completed on transitioning from an individual pharmacist member-based model to one in which the country’s provincial and territorial pharmacy advocacy groups form its membership. Among the reasons for this change is the desire for a stronger national voice for Canadian pharmacists in health policy discussions.

Canadian pharmacists may now individually be members of their provincial pharmacy association, and in turn the associations form the membership of the CPhA. As of early September all but two of the country’s provincial associations had completed the transition to CPhA membership, but Quebec and Manitoba were expected to sign on this month.

As of 2015, N.P.A.C. represents 17 pharmacy chains, banners and franchisors, which operate approximately 6,500 pharmacies across Canada. Retail pharmacy companies comprise the membership base; pharmaceutical manufacturers, and makers of other healthcare and consumer goods products are represented as associate members.

The N.P.A.C has also launched a new website.

News
Posted Sep 19, 2014

Introducing…the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

Announcement, Feature Story, News, Operations updates, PharmacyU, Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada
Introducing…the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada
There’s a new advocate in communities across Canada dedicated to bringing healthcare closer to Canadians where they live, work and play.

There’s a new advocate in communities across Canada dedicated to bringing healthcare closer to Canadians where they live, work and play.

By Talbot Boggs

The Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (formerly the Canadian Association of Chain Drug Stores) unveiled itself and its new brand at its fall meeting in Toronto in September.

“A little more than a year ago we set out to transform our industry and the way neighbourhood pharmacy is viewed in this country by patients, the profession, private payers and governments,” said Frank Scorpiniti, Chair of the association’s Board and CEO of Rexall. “We then began a five-year strategic plan with the bold vision of becoming a strong voice and leading advocate for the business and a trusted adviser to governments, and formally committed our industry and association to being part of the solution to the challenges facing Canada’s healthcare system.”

In the last year the association launched its healthcare closer to home advocacy program focused on patients and the valuable services that neighbourhood pharmacies provide to them. The program includes a branded, public-friendly web site, national and local media articles and a tour program that takes politicians into neighbourhood pharmacies to demonstrate how expanded scope of practice can deliver better patient outcomes and make better use of taxpayers’ dollars.

The association established a formal public affairs program and engaged with key government contacts on new funding models and sustainable health policies to enhance patient care and access to healthcare services.

It also completed national public opinion and baseline behavioural research, specifically examining Canadians’ perception of neighbourhood pharmacy and how patients manage chronic conditions.

“The research shows that Canadians recognize pharmacy’s potential contribution to primary healthcare, but they also want to know more about what is being offered and the benefits to all stakeholders,” Scorpiniti said. “Our proprietary research delivers both the fuel and the credibility to drive our association’s advocacy efforts with governments in support of favourable policy development and provincial negotiations.”

The research is summarized in a family of new publications called the neighbourhood pharmacy research series, designed to develop evidence-based business and policy proposals that deliver tangible positive health and economic outcomes and deliver strategic insights about neighbourhood pharmacy, patients, payers, governments and private payers.

The association, added Scorpiniti, will continue to be at the forefront of changes in healthcare policy, advocating for pharmacists to ensure neighbourhood pharmacies are appropriately valued across Canada and are part of the solution to a sustainable healthcare system.

Check out the new website: http://www.neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca/

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Posted Sep 19, 2014

News From Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada

Feature Story, News, Operations updates, Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada
News From Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada
NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA CREATED TO DRIVE GROWTH OF PHARMACY SERVICES, HELP SUSTAIN CANADIANS’ ACCESS TO QUALITY, AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE

 

NEIGHBOURHOOD PHARMACY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA CREATED TO DRIVE GROWTH OF PHARMACY SERVICES, HELP SUSTAIN CANADIANS’ ACCESS TO QUALITY, AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE

 

  • Represents approximately 6,500 neighbourhood pharmacies
  • Delivers trusted, professional healthcare advice to almost 80% of Canadians
  • Employs approximately 500,000 Canadians

 

 

TORONTO, September 17, 2014 – Today, the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada (Neighbourhood Pharmacy), a strong voice for pharmacy’s contribution to Canada’s healthcare delivery system, was introduced. The association represents approximately 6,500 neighbourhood pharmacies from coast to coast to coast, in rural and urban communities.

 

“Neighbourhood pharmacy is an essential and increasingly important healthcare service provider, that is enhancing patient outcomes, reducing overall healthcare costs and improving access to care by delivering services closer to where Canadians live, work and play,” said Neighbourhood Pharmacy’s Board Chair Frank Scorpiniti, Chief Executive Officer of Rexall.

 

The organization draws strength from Canadians’ strong and increasingly positive view of neighbourhood pharmacies. According to a recent national survey, overall favourability has increased to 76.1%, from 68.9% in 2013. Canadians also see pharmacies as being friendly (90.5% agree or somewhat agree) and providing advice that is accessible (89.5%) and affordable (84.2%) – and more Canadians attribute all three of these characteristics to pharmacies in 2014 than in 2013.

 

“Neighbourhood Pharmacy exists to help connect our members with governments and others in healthcare to identify, research and develop proposals that deliver tangible health and economic benefits for Canadians,” said Denise Carpenter, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Association. “Our healthcare delivery system faces significant challenges from rising costs and an aging population. Access to healthcare, closer to home, plays a significant role in driving better patient outcomes and reducing overall healthcare costs.”

 

Neighbourhood pharmacies employ approximately 500,000 Canadians in settings ranging from independent retailers to larger chain pharmacies. In 2013, the broader pharmacy industry unveiled “9000 Points of Care,” a policy platform to improve access to affordable healthcare.

 

“Our public policy platform, “9000 Points of Care,” identifies strategies to make better use of the broader pharmacy community’s capabilities. We are poised to work with governments and others in the healthcare community to demonstrate the efficacy of these strategies so that they can be implemented around the country,” concluded Carpenter.    

 

 

For further information please contact:

 

Allan McN. Austin

aaustin@neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

416 226 9100 ext 222

647 465 7596

neighbourhoodpharmacies.ca

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News
Posted Sep 16, 2014

Pharmacists welcome expanded services

Feature Story, Healthcare Closer to Home, Pharmacy Business, Pharmacy Owner
Pharmacists welcome expanded services
Heath check - Arthur pharmacist Joe Walsh, right, shows local MPPs Randy Pettapiece and Ted Arnott a virtual program of health care items that can be purchased for a variety of home settings. The program allows customers to browse a wide range of health c

Pharmacists welcome expanded services

by Kris Svela

ARTHUR -  Pharmacist Joe Walsh believes people in his business can help save money in frontline health care.

 

“The government doesn’t ask the people on the front line how to save money,” Walsh told Wellington-Halton Hills MPP Ted Arnott and Perth-Wellington MPP Randy Pettapiece, who visited his store in Arthur on Aug. 18.

The visit was part of a recently launched “Healthcare Closer to Home: Improving Access to Quality Care, Across Canada” campaign.

Walsh points out regulations that now allow pharmacists to give flu shots have already saved money with patients not needing to take up a physician’s time for flu shot appointments. The pharmacist said the procedure could be expanded to include travel vaccines.

The focus of the campaign is to expand services provided by pharmacists in their local communities at less cost to the overall health care system.

“It’s one-stop shopping,” Walsh said of the services his business provides.

A campaign press release from the Canadian Association of Chain Drug Stores states, “The specialized training of Canada’s pharmacists makes them a knowledgeable, regulated and most importantly, accessible, resource.”

Walsh said about 150 residents were vaccinated against the flu last year at his store and he expects that number will climb to 200 this year. Across Canada the number of patients receiving flu vaccinations at pharmacies, as opposed to doctors’ offices, has climbed from 125,000 to 750,000.

Walsh said assisting his customers at the pharmacy with advice on medicine use is important.

“That gives seniors the independence so they can stay at home,” he said.

Walsh estimates he makes about three home visits a day to look in on his customers and give them any health-related advice. During the visits he can discuss medications used by the individual and check blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

“It’s about getting the information out to seniors,” he said.

http://wellingtonadvertiser.com/comments/index.cfm?articleID=22777&article_id=18701074804

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Posted Sep 16, 2014

Healthcare Closer to Home

Feature Story, Healthcare Closer to Home, Pharmacy Business, Pharmacy Owner
Healthcare Closer to Home
Access to Health Care Randy Pettapiece and Ted Arnott visited Walsh’s Pharmacy in Arthur on August 15 to discuss with Joe Walsh, pharmacist, the ‘Healthcare Closer to Home’ initiative that will expand the scope of practice for Ontario pharmacists.
Healthcare Closer to Home

By Kelsey Dunbar

Enterprise news Express Staff

Ontario pharmacists are now encouraged to expand their practice into home visits, medication counselling, flu shots and vaccination, to name a few, as part of the national initiative ‘Healthcare Closer to Home’.

On August 15, MPP Ted Arnott and MPP Randy Pettapiece visited Walsh’s pharmacy in Arthur to discuss the benefits Joe Walsh, local pharmacist, has seen in his patients while providing and enhancing access to care within the Healthcare Closer to Home initiative.

“We (pharmacists) have the ability to come together and help keep people in their homes and healthier longer,” Walsh said.

An important part of the healthcare initiative is to connect pharmacists, like Walsh, with their members of provincial parliament to discuss the benefits of the initiative as well as what can be done to make healthcare more affordable and accessible.

A common concern among all Canadians is the accessibility of our health system in doctor’s offices and wait times in hospitals across the nation. This healthcare initiative has been designed to allow pharmacists to treat minor ailments and administer vaccines. In three years the goal is for the initiative to prevent up to 600,000 ER visits, 1,500 hospitalizations and free up 2.4 million physician hours, nation wide, to allow doctors to focus on more critical care, all by simply broadening the horizon of practices administered by pharmacists.

“This is what I was trained in school for,” Walsh said. “I never took a course on trying to figure out a person’s insurance, counting tablets or answering the phone. What I learned was counselling patients on their medication and that is what we are supposed to be doing.”

The Healthcare Closer to Home initiative has four major ways through which pharmacists can expand their practice and deliver front-line care.

Medication Counseling

Pharmacists can provide advice through medication counselling and help those suffering from chronic conditions and protect Canadian patients from adverse drug reactions.

It is said that 37 per cent or more than 12 million Canadians are living with chronic conditions.

“I have done, I would say 325 to 400 in home medicine checks, and I have found something wrong in every single one of them,” Walsh said.

With the combined support of physicians and pharmacists, effective treatment can be delivered via medication management. During a counselling session the Pharmacists can offer expert advice on how and when medications can be taken to make medication and therapy most effective.

Walsh told the MPPs about a man he had met on a counselling session who had been washing down his medicines with whiskey and had no idea the health risks that could have occurred.

“He would have never got that information if I hadn’t gone and visited him,” Walsh said.

Flu Shots and Vaccinations

More accessibility to flu shots will mean higher per cent of doses administered. In 2010, flu shots in the United States was 43 per cent of the population, while in Canada it was only 30 per cent. This is because Americans have more access to flu shots at their local pharmacies.

“You get more people vaccinated more quickly, more effectively and that cuts down on the spread of the disease through the population and it also takes strain off of doctors offices,” director of communications for the Canadian Association of Chain Drug Stores, Allen Austin said.

Walsh expects to administer 200 flu shots this coming season, up from 150 last season.

Minor Diagnosis and Prescribing

Studies show that 15 per cent of all visits to physicians are for minor ailments such as cold sores, dermatitis, hey fever, back pain and minor infections. Patients can wait up to three weeks to see a doctor, while pharmacists with the skill and knowledge may be able to deliver treatment easily and most importantly more efficiently.

Wellness Counseling

Providing pharmacists with the ability to demonstrate to patients how to properly use their medical devices, such as inhalers and epi-pens, will ensure patients are properly taking medication and lower the ricks of emergency healthcare or specialized treatments.

A counselling session can also demonstrate to patients how to make their homes safer and more accessible for wheel chairs, scooters, walkers etc. Pharmacists can go over bathroom safety with the patients on their own schedules and closer to home, in fact sometimes in their own home.

There is a catalog at the Arthur pharmacy that shows 3,000 items, everything from a battery operated jar opener to plates with a lip to make it easier to feed yourself, all that can improve the way of life for someone with mobility issues.

The number of Canadians with diabetes is expected to increase 35 per cent or from 3.1 million to 4.2 million Canadians. Pharmacists can play and essential role in diabetes education and care with wellness counselling.

Pharmacists with expanded scope of practise will better serve patients, providing much needed on-demand access to care, ensuring patients receive the support they need to stay at home and healthy.

http://www.southwesternontario.ca/news/healthcare-closer-to-home/

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Posted Sep 16, 2014

Watch & Learn video: Pharmasave’s Mark Gayowksi treats his patients like family

Pharmasave, News, Pharmacy Business, Pharmacy Owner, Healthcare Closer to Home, Feature Story, PharmacyU
In more than 30 years as a pharmacist, Mark Gayowski has maintained one guiding principle regardless of how much or how quickly the industry of pharmacy changes – always treat your patients like family.

In more than 30 years as a pharmacist, Mark Gayowski has maintained one guiding principle regardless of how much or how quickly the industry of pharmacy changes – always treat your patients like family.

By Talbot Boggs

Photography by John Packman

“It’s amazing how so much of what we do and the services we offer ultimately are driven by our patients,” says Gayowski. “We try to be welcoming and open, and the rest just seems to evolve from there.”

Gayowski has created a strong community-based business focused on individualized service and care. His 7,000 sq. ft. Pharmasave pharmacy in Stoney Creek, Ont. is a hub of services geared toward making healthcare more accessible and convenient, offering such services as specialized compounding, flu immunizations, diabetes education and counselling, medication reviews, compliance packaging, and lifestyle consultations, an extensive range of home healthcare products, as well as access to related healthcare professionals such as occupational therapists and physicians with specialized training.

“We have made a huge effort to equip our store to handle as many of our customers’ health and pharmaceutical needs as possible,” Gayowski says. “We have become a home healthcare shopping destination offering standard products but also more specialized ostomy, lymphademic products, compression stockings, back and mobility aids and specialized personal consultations and assessments. We also do deliveries, and our staff members participate in community health fairs and expositions.”

Gayowski has made a point of engaging his customers, both in the pharmacy and in the community, and forging relationships with doctors and other healthcare professionals. He has set up information kiosks in his store which promote its many services. Staff members are on hand to explain products and services, and identify patients who could best benefit from them.

Special community services

Gayowski also makes a point of bringing in specialists to deliver presentations and educational seminars on health and lifestyle issues. He is planning on launching a social media advertising campaign to educate the community on his offerings.

“A lot of doctors now just fax patient prescriptions to us because of these services,” Gayowski explains. “The patients show up on our doorstep and we explain the medications to them. It’s often the first touch point we have with them and often results in their bringing other scripts to us and purchasing other products and services. You can try to create new relationships, but often they end up being customer driven.”

Gayowski is actively introducing new programs and services designed to further improve the amount and convenience of care available to the community. Once provincial legislation is in place he will implement a travel health program, including inoculations, in the pharmacy. He recently began offering a four-step weight-loss program that has become extremely popular with customers. As well, he is launching an electronic-care system that allows patients to see their medical profiles, order refills, book appointments, ask questions, get information and receive tax receipts for purchases, online on their computers and mobile devices.

The new community-service-based pharmacy business model requires a total commitment from everyone involved. Gayowski’s pharmacy has two full-time and three to four part-time pharmacists, two registered technician students, three part-time technicians, as well as frontshop and home healthcare managers.

While the new model is creating challenges, it is also creating great opportunities for pharmacies that are willing to embrace them. “The new model may be pushing some people out of their comfort zone, but it really is allowing us to spread our wings and bring our patients a wider range of healthcare products and services closer to their homes and where they work and play.”

http://pharmacyu.ca/2014/07/16/watch-learn-video-pharmasaves-mark-gayowksi-treats-his-patients-like-family/

News
Posted Sep 16, 2014

Walsh’s Pharmacy offers customers healthcare closer to home

Healthcare Closer to Home, News, Pharmacy Business, PharmacyU, McKesson, IDA, Pharmacy Owner
For more than 60 years, the Walsh family have worked diligently to bring healthcare closer to their patients, both inside and outside the doors of Walsh’s Pharmacy IDA in Arthur, a rural farming community located approximately 50 kilometres north of Kitch

For more than 60 years, the Walsh family have worked diligently to bring healthcare closer to their patients, both inside and outside the doors of Walsh’s Pharmacy IDA in Arthur, a rural farming community located approximately 50 kilometres north of Kitchener, Ontario.

By Talbot Boggs

Photography by JP Borchardt

Pharmacist-owner Joe Walsh, along with his wife Cheryl and their two children, is carrying on the tradition begun by his father John in serving the 3,500 residents of Arthur and another 2,500 in surrounding areas.

“We’ve lived in Arthur all our lives and are really connected with the community,” says Joe. “We’re your stereotypical rural pharmacy and do just about everything to cater to the health needs of our patients.  We will go to their homes, and through our website they can connect directly with us in the town and get all the information on our products and services. You name it and we’ll do it.”

On his days out of the pharmacy, it’s not uncommon for Joe to visit patients to conduct MedsChecks or inspect their homes for mobility devices, safety features and expired prescriptions. “It lets me see people in their natural environments and get to know things that they might not tell me in an office setting in the store,” he says.

With the change in the neighbourhood pharmacy business in Ontario, Walsh decided in 2010 to place a strong emphasis on home healthcare products and other health-related services in his 6,000 sq. ft. store to generate new income streams and improve the quality of patient care. He offers an extensive range of bathroom safety products such as grab bars, safety rails, bath seats, bath transfer benches and boards, toilet safety frames, raised toilet seats, bedside commodes and bed pans and urinals. If he doesn’t stock the items himself, he can order them.

Value-added offerings for the community

He offers regular compounding, blister packaging and home deliveries, flu shots, and a series of in-store clinics on heart health, diabetes, cholesterol, arthritis and other health topics during non-winter months because of winter weather and travel challenges for his non-resident patients. Walsh has implemented a patient reminder system which automatically calls patients and notifies them when their prescriptions are ready or need refilling.

From a computer in a kiosk in the store, patients can access a catalogue of more than 3,000 products, get information on more than a dozen common disease states such as first-stage Parkinson’s, osteoporosis, dementia and others, and recommended home healthcare products to help them manage these diseases in their homes. He also offers hospital beds and the rollator – a walking device equipped with a seat – which patients can purchase or rent.

“It’s all geared to keeping people in their homes as long as possible,” notes Joe. “Through the computer we can meet the needs of people in a much larger trading area, many of whom are in very rural and remote locations and might not easily be able to come to the store in person.”

The key to being able to feature effective home healthcare products and services is having a dedicated staff. After he shifted the focus of his business toward service and home healthcare, Joe added extra staff, whom he now calls his ambassadors. “They are the biggest plus to my business and my ability to offer superior home healthcare products and services to our patients,” he says. “This is what we’ve tried to provide to our community for more than 60 years and what we’ll continue to do in the future, and for that you need a great team.”

 

http://pharmacyu.ca/2014/08/28/walshs-pharmacy-offers-customers-healthcare-closer-to-home/

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Posted Sep 16, 2014

CACDS launches Healthcare Closer to Home

Healthcare Closer to Home, PharmacyU, Pharmacy Business, Cover Story, News, Announcement
CACDS launches Healthcare Closer to Home
Denise Carpenter has spent her entire career working on behalf of Canadian organizations in the public policy, communications and governance arenas. She has led many initiatives to build policy directions that benefit Canadians, as well as the organizatio

By Jane Auster

Photography by Brandon Gray

As president and CEO of the Canadian Association of Chain Drug Stores since January 2013, she has been searching for new ways to tell the story of how pharmacies are making a difference in their neighbourhoods. A new CACDS initiative – Healthcare Closer to Home – promises to shine new light on pharmacies as vital healthcare hubs and pharmacists as healthcare champions.

When you hear the phrase “Healthcare Closer to Home,” what comes to your mind?

It’s very natural when you are talking about pharmacy: it’s in your neigh­bourhood, where you live, where you work, where you play. The phar­macy is playing much more of a key role in the whole team of healthcare providers. Healthcare Closer to Home is an opportunity to talk about what we’re doing, to continue to build the value of pharmacists in our pharma­cies for Canadians across the country.

What is the thinking behind Healthcare Closer to Home?

It’s time for pharmacies to tell their stories and to shout out loud. Pharma­cists are rightly proud of what they are doing, as expanded scope of practice takes off, and they are the frontline healthcare delivery team.

Most importantly, Healthcare Closer to Home is not a one-time program, it’s an opportunity to share the stories, and an opportunity for our pharma­cists to stand up and be proud of what they do every day. And when our stakeholders see this, they are going to continue to support and promote expanded scope of practice and pharmacy services.

What is the purpose of Healthcare Closer to Home?

There are really three main purposes:

  • To position neighbourhood pharmacies as “go-to” primary healthcare destinations in the minds of Canadians.
  • To increase political understanding of, and belief in, the benefits of expanded capacity for neighbourhood pharmacy, and to show that we have the capacity, the advanced services, and the expertise within neighbourhoods.
  • To increase neighbourhood pharmacy and pharmacist awareness and understanding of, and support for, increased scope of practice and capacity.With the name Healthcare Closer to Home, are you trying to convey convenience as well as expertise?In neighbourhood pharmacies in many prov­inces, the pharmacist can prescribe for minor ailments. With a neighbourhood pharmacist and expanded scope of practice (like prescribing for minor ailments), you get both the professional assess­ment and the solution at the same time, in the same place. That’s convenient.They can have access to primary healthcare services where and when it’s convenient for them.Canadians do have a growing respect for pharmacies and pharmacists. But we also have choices when it comes to meeting our health­care needs. Neighbourhood pharmacies offer an outstanding convenience proposition, but I think our pharmacies and pharmacists can’t take Canadians’ trust and respect for granted, and have to work hard every day to maintain their relationships with patients.Adherence to medications is one of our great healthcare challenges, particularly with our rapidly aging population, and it’s one of the areas where neighbourhood pharmacy can have the greatest positive impact, both for individuals and for the whole healthcare system.The “healthcare closer to home” approach offered by pharmacies frees physicians to address more serious, complex and urgent conditions. What will constitute a “win” for you with Healthcare Closer to Home? How will you measure its success?
  • In several ways:
  • And there are significant cost benefits, because the patient in pharmacy is being seen by the best-suited – and most appropriate cost – provider. How often have we heard stories of patients going to the ER for a minor complaint that could have been handled far more effi­ciently by the local pharmacy?
  • How is the fact that more Canadians are seeking out pharmacies for their healthcare needs helping the overall healthcare system?
  • Let’s say I come in to pick up prescrip­tions for my family. My pharmacist can also ask me about flu shots, and on the next visit the pharmacist might say, ‘I notice you haven’t refilled your prescription.’ With a continuing relationship of trust, the pharmacist is going to help me and my family stay well, and then we have built a full cycle with the pharmacist and the family.
  • Canadians have a growing respect for the role of pharmacies and pharmacists as their go-to healthcare professionals. Do you think awareness is increasing?
  • The point is, neighbourhood pharmacy fits into your daily routine. It doesn’t have to be something separate, or about making make an appointment for three weeks out. Conven­ience and accessibility are essential. We want Canadians to see their pharmacy healthcare services as part of their daily lives.
  • Absolutely, convenience. During my working day, I can call in my refills, drop in on my way home, get my flu shot, pick up my prescriptions, walk down the aisle to pick up other items on my list, and then head home.
  • Like any other industry, we want to shout out loud about our services and capabilities. We want to tell those stories. Stakeholders across Canada are seeing the value of what neighbourhood pharmacy can do – for indi­vidual patients and for the whole healthcare delivery system – so it’s important that we reach legislators, regulators and opinion lead­ers with these stories
  • Increasing awareness of the value of neigh­bourhood pharmacy to the healthcare system among legislative and regulatory bodies across Canada.Enhancing the opportunities for Canadian pharmacists to tell their story about expanded scope of practice.
  • Seeing more Canadians go to neighbourhood pharmacies for their primary healthcare service needs.
  • Increasing interest on the part of media and other stakeholders in the expanding role of pharmacists. 
  • With this initiative we have a great oppor­tunity to contribute to the evolution of health­care in Canada and ensuring that Canadians have continuing access to quality, affordable healthcare. I am proud to be part of that. Tell­ing this story is so important.

http://pharmacyu.ca/2014/07/05/cacds-launches-healthcare-closer-to-home/

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